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Contents, Tom Mack, Ph.D. 2010 University of South Carolina Aiken

Contents, Tom Mack, Ph.D.

The Oswald Review: An International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Criticism in the Discipline of English

No abstract provided.


Revisions To Realist Representation In Far From The Madding Crowd And Heart Of Darkness., Paul Robertson Stephens 2010 The Open University Milton Keynes United Kingdom

Revisions To Realist Representation In Far From The Madding Crowd And Heart Of Darkness., Paul Robertson Stephens

The Oswald Review: An International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Criticism in the Discipline of English

No abstract provided.


The Tractarians' Sermons And Other Speeches, Robert Ellison 2010 Marshall University

The Tractarians' Sermons And Other Speeches, Robert Ellison

English Faculty Research

This is the first chapter of A New History of the Sermon: The Nineteenth Century, a collection of essays I edited for Brill Academic Publishers. It provides an overview of the Tractarians' homiletic theory, and examines the various genres of their oratory: sermons (both "plain" and "university"), lectures, and episcopal charges.


Introduction To A New History Of The Sermon : The Nineteenth Century, Robert Ellison 2010 Marshall University

Introduction To A New History Of The Sermon : The Nineteenth Century, Robert Ellison

English Faculty Research

This is the introduction to A New History of the Sermon:The Nineteenth Century, a collection of essays I edited for Brill Academic Publishers. It discusses the concept and history of "rhetorical criticism," and seeks to lay a foundation for the rhetorical study of the Anglo-American pulpit.


“Murdering An Aunt Or Two”: Textual Practice And Narrative Form In Virginia Woolf’S Metropolitan Market, John K. Young 2010 Marshall University

“Murdering An Aunt Or Two”: Textual Practice And Narrative Form In Virginia Woolf’S Metropolitan Market, John K. Young

English Faculty Research

As evidence for the multiple connections between the commercial and intellectual freedoms provided by the Hogarth Press for its co-owner and leading author, consider a diary entry from September 1925:

How my hand writing goes down hill! Another sacrifice to the Hogarth Press. Yet what I owe the Hogarth Press is barely paid by the whole of my handwriting…I’m the only woman in England free to write what I like. The others must be thinking of series’ & editors. Yesterday I heard from Harcourt Brace that Mrs. D & C.R. are selling 148 & 73 weekly--Isn’t that a surprising ...


The Postcolonial "Knight‘S Tale": A Social Commentary On Post-Norman Invasion England, Ruth M.E. Oldman 2010 Marshall University

The Postcolonial "Knight‘S Tale": A Social Commentary On Post-Norman Invasion England, Ruth M.E. Oldman

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

Every author injects a purpose into his or her works; in Chaucer‘s case, he scribed The Canterbury Tales, which tackles and successfully demonstrates various aspects to fourteenth century English society and culture. "The Knight‘s Tale" is no different; the tale is almost identical, plot-wise, to Giovanni Boccaccio‘s Teseida, and yet Chaucer weaves a tale that is distinctive. The tale reflects Chaucer‘s views on his society, in particular post-Norman attitudes. By examining the text with a post-colonial theoretical approach, Chaucer‘s "The Knight‘s Tale" is a subaltern commentary on the colonization of England after the Norman ...


The Power Of Pain Gender, Sadism, And Masochism In The Works Of Wilkie Collins, Helen Doyle 2010 Bridgewater State University

The Power Of Pain Gender, Sadism, And Masochism In The Works Of Wilkie Collins, Helen Doyle

Undergraduate Review

In his novels No Name (1862) and Armadale (1866), Wilkie Collins explores the social role of women in Victorian England, a patriarchal society that forced women either to submit to the control of a man or rebel at the expense of their own health and sanity. Even though some of his characters eventually marry, thus conforming to social expectations for women, I argue that his portrayal of female characters was subversive. In quests for control over their own lives, Magdalen Vanstone and Lydia Gwilt turn to masochism and sadism, practices which eventually lead to identity loss and self-destruction. Collins suggests ...


Review Of The Voice Of The Hammer: The Meaning Of Work In Middle English Literature, Gregory M. Sadlek 2010 Cleveland State University

Review Of The Voice Of The Hammer: The Meaning Of Work In Middle English Literature, Gregory M. Sadlek

English Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Review Of The Literary Culture Of The Reformation: Grammar And Grace / Liturgy And Literature In The Making Of Protestant England By Brian Cummings And Timothy Rosendale, Brooke Conti 2010 Cleveland State University

Review Of The Literary Culture Of The Reformation: Grammar And Grace / Liturgy And Literature In The Making Of Protestant England By Brian Cummings And Timothy Rosendale, Brooke Conti

English Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Ethic Of High Expectations, Jean Galbraith 2010 University of Pennsylvania Law School

The Ethic Of High Expectations, Jean Galbraith

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Interpretations Of Medievalism In The 19th Century: Keats, Tennyson And The Pre-Raphaelites, Shannon K. Wilsey 2010 Claremont McKenna College

Interpretations Of Medievalism In The 19th Century: Keats, Tennyson And The Pre-Raphaelites, Shannon K. Wilsey

CMC Senior Theses

This thesis describes how different 19th century poets and artists depicted elements of the medieval in their artwork as a means to contradict the rapid progress and metropolitan build-up of the Industrial Revolution. The poets discussed are John Keats and Alfred, Lord Tennyson; the painters include William Holman Hunt and John William Waterhouse. Examples of the poems and corresponding Pre-Raphaelite depictions include The Eve of Saint Agnes, La Belle Dame Sans Merci and The Lady of Shalott.


Tragic Pleasure In Shakespeare's King Lear And Othello, Luella Fu 2010 Claremont McKenna College

Tragic Pleasure In Shakespeare's King Lear And Othello, Luella Fu

CMC Senior Theses

This thesis is an examination of reader or audience response to Shakespeare’s tragedies. Primarily, it identifies key pleasures that Shakespeare’s King Lear and Othello offer. The complementary nature of these two plays is such that the analysis of their various pleasures allows for an in-depth treatment of the topic and also reflects the diversity of emotional response elicited by Shakespeare’s tragedies. The kinds of pleasure addressed in this study are catharsis as explained by Aristotle, the delight of violent passion as advocated by DuBos, pleasure from details in the work, satisfaction from the coherence of the tragedy ...


Your Change Is Still Behind: Futurity In Early Modern Literature, Tripthi Pillai 2010 Loyola University Chicago

Your Change Is Still Behind: Futurity In Early Modern Literature, Tripthi Pillai

Dissertations

A study of Renaissance literature's engagement with temporality, my project is a critical evaluation of the concept of early modern futurity, of which I propose three categories: "Material futurity"; "Biological futurity"; and "Political futurity." In the moments that I identify in texts composed during the Tudor and early Stuart reigns in England, I demonstrate that the future--as an idea--structures individuals' actions and ruptures social formations. Futurity, which I define as a play of multiple desires that exist simultaneously within our present beings, is a volatile agent of imagination in early modern literature. Futurity collides with the cultural sites of ...


Beckett's "Happy Days": Rewinding And Revolving Histories, Katherine Weiss 2010 East Tennessee State University

Beckett's "Happy Days": Rewinding And Revolving Histories, Katherine Weiss

ETSU Faculty Works

Excerpt: Beckett is keenly interested in ways individuals unsuccesfully atempt to disown their past. His explorations into this reflect his awareness of being a survivor of the Second World War.


Contrast And Didacticism In The Novels Of Jane Austen, Brittany Morgan Woodhams 2010 Edith Cowan University

Contrast And Didacticism In The Novels Of Jane Austen, Brittany Morgan Woodhams

Theses : Honours

The first aim of this thesis is to explore Jane Austen's use of contrast in terms of characterisation. The second is to look at how contrast becomes a tool of didacticism, both for the characters within the novels and for readers of the novels. This study encompasses Austen's six completed novels and traces the development of the techniques she used to evoke contrast. Austen used contrast in a variety of ways. Primarily it was used to construct and illuminate characters, but Austen also used it to introduce characters into the narrative, to compare two or more characters, and ...


Repressive Bodies, Transgressive Bodies : Dracula And The Feminine, Sharon Kostopoulos 2010 Edith Cowan University

Repressive Bodies, Transgressive Bodies : Dracula And The Feminine, Sharon Kostopoulos

Theses : Honours

Dracula has long been associated with the repressive qualities of Victorian society and the oppression of the emerging New Woman. However, taking into account that the novel is part of the gothic genre, a genre which endeavours to infringe the social boundaries in any given era, this thesis will demonstrate an equally visible and potent transgressive feminine element playing out in Dracula. Using Michel Foucault's idea of discourse to show how subjects are generated, the novel can be seen as facilitating both productive and repressive ideas of femininity. Power, as it operates through discourse, tends to produce its own ...


Uncommon Sense In Renaissance English Literature, Eric Byville 2010 Loyola University Chicago

Uncommon Sense In Renaissance English Literature, Eric Byville

Dissertations

My project explores the distinctive union of Senecan tragedy and Elizabethan satire in Renaissance English drama, particularly the works of John Marston and William Shakespeare. Unlike Ben Jonson, who incorporated both Senecan tragedy and Elizabethan satire in his drama but did so in different plays (Catiline, Every Man Out), Marston and Shakespeare combined the two traditions in one and the same play, such as the former's Antonio's Revenge (1600) and The Malcontent (c. 1603) and the latter's Troilus and Cressida (1601) and Timon of Athens (c. 1606). They recognized and exploited a deep compatibility between the two ...


Dreadful Sorry: Spots Of Passion And The Memory Of Being Human In Kaufman’S “Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind” And Pope’S ‘Eloisa To Abelard’, June-Ann Greeley 2010 Sacred Heart University

Dreadful Sorry: Spots Of Passion And The Memory Of Being Human In Kaufman’S “Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind” And Pope’S ‘Eloisa To Abelard’, June-Ann Greeley

Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies Faculty Publications

Memory is a journey of infinite possibility, a continuous passage through time and sense that offers each person an opportunity not merely to recall and to reflect on former occasions and previous experiences, but to reconsider and to reexamine the past as a guide, as instruction, for healthy individuation. Memory, then, can be understood to be the aggregate of experiential and emotional recollection that frames the essential ground in forming and realizing individual identity. Both Alexander Pope in his poem “Eloisa to Abelard” and Michel Gondry/Charlie Kaufman in the film “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” offer portraits of ...


Dickinson And Smith: Years Apart But Not So Different, Nicole Day 2010 California Polytechnic State University - San Luis Obispo

Dickinson And Smith: Years Apart But Not So Different, Nicole Day

English

Even though there were sixteen years separating them, Stevie Smith and Emily Dickinson had much in common. They both use death as a theme to explore and mock life. Their small poems have a lot to say about life and death.


Miller's "The Magician's Book: A Skeptic's Adventures In Narnia" - Book Review, Gary L. Tandy 2010 George Fox University

Miller's "The Magician's Book: A Skeptic's Adventures In Narnia" - Book Review, Gary L. Tandy

Faculty Publications - Department of English

No abstract provided.


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