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The Perpetual Creation And Provocation Of The Self, Krista Damico 2011 University of Rhode Island

The Perpetual Creation And Provocation Of The Self, Krista Damico

Senior Honors Projects

The Perpetual Creation and Provocation of the Self

Krista D’Amico

Faculty Sponsor: Stephen Barber, English

This project consists of four related parts. The first part is a critical and creative work of prose in which I converse with the thought of two philosophers, namely Spinoza and Gilles Deleuze. This conversation enables me to present my own thought and subjectivity in relationship to a very important aspect of my life: music-making. The second part of my project is a critical essay in which I contemplate the work of another artist, Virginia Woolf, and the way that her credo Three Guineas ...


Everyman, A Modern Adaptation (Or, Number's Down), Merrick Robison 2011 Olivet Nazarene University

Everyman, A Modern Adaptation (Or, Number's Down), Merrick Robison

Honors Program Projects

Everyman is the most well known morality play that came out of the turn of the 16th century. Innumerable amounts of people have seen it in performance, both in the 1500s and modern day, since its revivals at the turn of the 20th century. It is a common choice of performance both on the professional and college level, and offers many opportunities for adaptation and modernization. The purpose for the project is to research the production and literary history of Everyman in order to write, produce, direct and perform in a modern adaptation of the morality play so it may ...


When Men Cry: Male Demonstrations Of Grief In Beowulf, The Song Of Roland, And Sir Orfeo, Lindsey Beth Zachary 2011 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

When Men Cry: Male Demonstrations Of Grief In Beowulf, The Song Of Roland, And Sir Orfeo, Lindsey Beth Zachary

Theses and Dissertations

Frequently in medieval texts, writers make mention of men who cry, wail, and faint. However, in modern scholarship, these records of men who cry are often overlooked, and masculine mourning is a largely neglected feature. My purpose in this thesis is to explore some of the reasons for male tears and displays of grief in three works of medieval literature. While male mourning appears in hundreds of medieval texts and is a topic worthy of extensive exploration, I have narrowed my focus to three works: Beowulf, The Song of Roland, and Sir Orfeo. Although the three tales are written in ...


Early Modern Evil Genius: Hyperconformity And Objectivity In Sixteenth And Seventeenth-Century English Literature, Christine Hoffmann 2011 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Early Modern Evil Genius: Hyperconformity And Objectivity In Sixteenth And Seventeenth-Century English Literature, Christine Hoffmann

Theses and Dissertations

This dissertation studies the response among early modern and postmodern audiences to the experience of information overload, and suggests that the most appealing response to living in a communications network that appears both systematic and random is to use a rhetoric of struggle that is ambiguous in the same way. >The reasons for this appeal are twofold: firstly, the rhetoric of struggle is a way to cope with the difficulty of situating oneself within a system of circulating information that operates according to its own arbitrary rules. Mimicking that arbitrariness is a way of finding aesthetic synchronicity between how one ...


An Implacable Force: Caryl Churchill And The “Theater Of Cruelty”, Kerri Ann Considine 2011 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

An Implacable Force: Caryl Churchill And The “Theater Of Cruelty”, Kerri Ann Considine

Masters Theses

Churchill’s plays incorporate intensity, complexity, and imagination to create a theatrical landscape that is rich in danger and possibility. Examining her plays through the theoretical lens of Antonin Artaud’s “theater of cruelty” allows an open investigation into the way that violence, transgression, and theatricality function in her work to create powerful and thought-provoking pieces of theatre. By creating her own contemporary “theater of cruelty,” Churchill creates plays that actively and violently transgress physical, social, and political boundaries.

This paper examines three of Churchill’s plays spanning over thirty years of her career to investigate the different ways Churchill ...


Seeking The Self In Pigment And Pixels: Postmodernism, Art, And The Subject, Selma Purac 2011 University of Western Ontario

Seeking The Self In Pigment And Pixels: Postmodernism, Art, And The Subject, Selma Purac

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

In this study, I examine how works of art become vehicles for the postmodern inquiry into the nature of subjectivity. My thesis narrows the focus to those characters who attempt to ground themselves in works of art, especially representational paintings. I argue that, to cope with what they see as the chaos of a decentered postmodern world, these figures try to anchor their confused identities in what they wrongfully interpret as stable and mimetic artworks. Nostalgic for an imagined past when representation was transparent and corresponded to reality, they believe that traditional figurative art offers the promise of cohesive meaning ...


Of Milton’S First Disobedience And The Fruit Of The Tree: “Ad Patrem” As Prologue To Paradise Lost, C. Macaulay Ward Jr 2011 University of Massachusetts Boston

Of Milton’S First Disobedience And The Fruit Of The Tree: “Ad Patrem” As Prologue To Paradise Lost, C. Macaulay Ward Jr

Interdisciplinary Perspectives: a Graduate Student Research Showcase

In Paradise Lost, first published in 1667, John Milton assumes the role of God’s advocate to make the case that God’s decrees are beyond reproach; humankind’s eternal death sentence and the banishment from Eden, issued as a result of Adam and Eve’s disobedience, are not excessive punishments. Twelve books and nearly ten thousand lines later, however, Milton’s argument seems to contradict itself. The Archangel Michael tells Adam that in the fullness of time, a new Paradise will be established as a place of joy and wonder far superior to the original Eden; and ironically, this ...


"'Ic Paet Secgan Maeg, Hwaet Ic Yrmpa Gebad'": Christian Scribes' Condemnation Of Blood Feud And Its Effect On Women In Anglo-Saxon Society, Tara Seate-Beck 2011 Longwood University

"'Ic Paet Secgan Maeg, Hwaet Ic Yrmpa Gebad'": Christian Scribes' Condemnation Of Blood Feud And Its Effect On Women In Anglo-Saxon Society, Tara Seate-Beck

Theses, Dissertations & Honors Papers

In preserving The Wife 's Lament, Wulf and Eadwacer, and Beowulf's battle scene with Grendel's mother, Christian poets and scribes preserved much more than just the literature of Anglo-Saxon England. They recorded the feminine voice, a rare perspective emerging from a society founded principally on the fundamentals of warfare and male dominance. The women's songs stand as testaments to the strife and discord women suffered as a consequence of their husbands' participation in blood feud. Their stories are not merely recounted as third person narratives, as much of the other extant texts from the period are; in ...


Heckscher, Robert Valantine, B. 1883 (Sc 2444), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2011 Western Kentucky University

Heckscher, Robert Valantine, B. 1883 (Sc 2444), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 2444. Letter of English poet Robert Valantine Heckscher, postmarked 5 January 1914, to Curtis H. Page, a professor of English at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. He thanks Page for praise of his book of poems, Rose Windows, and contrasts its favorable reception by the public and literary community with that of the general press.


Trevelyan, George Otto, 1838-1928 (Sc 2436), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2011 Western Kentucky University

Trevelyan, George Otto, 1838-1928 (Sc 2436), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 2436. Letter of George Otto Trevelyan to Joseph H. Choate, 18 March 1912, written on the publication in the United States of Trevelyan’s book George the Third and Charles Fox. Trevelyan remarks on the book’s favorable reception in Britain and gives news of his family.


“Look Back At Me”: North And South And The Two-Faced Neo-Victorian Gaze, Julie Ellen Pickens 2011 Cedarville University

“Look Back At Me”: North And South And The Two-Faced Neo-Victorian Gaze, Julie Ellen Pickens

English Seminar Capstone Research Papers

No abstract provided.


The Fantasy Of The Real: J.R.R. Tolkien, Modernism, And Postmodernism, Hannah Brady 2011 Cedarville University

The Fantasy Of The Real: J.R.R. Tolkien, Modernism, And Postmodernism, Hannah Brady

English Seminar Capstone Research Papers

J.R.R. Tolkien’s trilogy, The Lord of the Rings, grips readers of all ages in the power of its story and characters. Tolkien leads his audience through a world and a time that is entirely different from that of contemporary society, but he also remains true to the human condition as the morals and conflicts within the story resonate with authentic human emotion. Tolkien allows readers to temporarily escape the present although not to forget reality. Tolkien follows his own “rules” of “fairy-story” in order to present a fantastical tale that represents Truth better than many stories that ...


Liberating The Zeitgeist: Using Metaphor & Emotion To Unlock The Transcendency Of The Short Story, Vincent Bish 2011 Trinity College

Liberating The Zeitgeist: Using Metaphor & Emotion To Unlock The Transcendency Of The Short Story, Vincent Bish

General Student Scholarship

Barometers have often been likened to short stories—measuring momentary shifts in atmospheric pressure. Short Stories, like barometers are sensitive instruments, recording impressions about the stresses our world is under. What separates Short Stories though from their meteorological counterparts is that, what they measure is infinitely more elusive than the pressure air places on the Earth. What they measure are the prevailing spirits of a times—the Zeitgeist.

These four authors, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Joyce, and Crane, have, in their respective texts, created stories that not only measure this spirit but capture it. From a writer’s perspective, these authors imbedded ...


Escaping To The Sickbed: Illness In Frankenstein, Eleanor Cory '12 2011 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Escaping To The Sickbed: Illness In Frankenstein, Eleanor Cory '12

2011 Spring Semester

Illness tends to lead to separation from society. Becoming sick has always been a reason for someone to stay home to avoid spreading the disease to other people, and because continuing to work rather than resting may cause the one’s condition to get worse or, at the very least, take more time to improve. Throughout Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein, the main character falls sick very often, regularly separating himself from society. His deteriorating physical state appears to be linked to the monster he creates, as he usually succumbs to illness immediately after a traumatizing confrontation with it. The ...


The Realization Of The Romantic In "Adonais", Grace Cao 2011 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

The Realization Of The Romantic In "Adonais", Grace Cao

2011 Spring Semester

In every life, there comes a moment when one wonders if a greater meaning exists beyond this mundane, often sordid world. Is man merely the sum of countless inane struggles, or is there a loftier purpose towards which he can strive? Romanticism is an attempt to answer this question, and is shaped by the belief that there is indeed a more perfect plane which humans yearn to reach. Few works embody the spirit of this movement as well as Percy Bysshe Shelley’s 1821 elegy for John Keats, “Adonais.” By alluding to a Platonic world, idealizing nature, and expressing an ...


Piracy, Slavery, And Assimilation: Women In Early Modern Captivity Literature, David C. Moberly 2011 University of Nebraska – Lincoln

Piracy, Slavery, And Assimilation: Women In Early Modern Captivity Literature, David C. Moberly

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research: Department of English

This thesis examines a hitherto neglected body of works featuring female characters enslaved in Islamicate lands. During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, many Englishmen and women were taken captive by pirates and enslaved in what is now the Middle East and North Africa. Several writers of the time created narratives and dramas about the experiences of such captives. Recent scholarship has brought to light many of these works and pointed out their importance in establishing what was still a young, unsure, and developing English identity in this early period. Most of this scholarship, however, has dealt with narratives of the ...


Technoromanticism: Creating Digital Editions In An Undergraduate Classroom, Katherine D. Harris 2011 San Jose State University

Technoromanticism: Creating Digital Editions In An Undergraduate Classroom, Katherine D. Harris

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Book Review: Women And Ireland As Beckett's Lost Others, Jennifer Jeffers 2011 Cleveland State University

Book Review: Women And Ireland As Beckett's Lost Others, Jennifer Jeffers

English Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Technoromanticism: Creating Digital Editions In An Undergraduate Classroom, Katherine D. Harris 2011 San Jose State University

Technoromanticism: Creating Digital Editions In An Undergraduate Classroom, Katherine D. Harris

Katherine D. Harris

No abstract provided.


Metaphasia: Shelley And The Language Of Remoter Worlds, Michael Andrew Howell 2011 University of Southern Mississippi

Metaphasia: Shelley And The Language Of Remoter Worlds, Michael Andrew Howell

Master's Theses

The aim of this project was to trace the evolution of Percy Shelley's metaphasic narrative, or language of the dead, chronologically through the Hymn to Intellectual Beauty, Mont Blanc, and Prometheus Unbound. Proceeding from Earl Wasserman's detailed map of Shelley's mythopoeic structure, I charted this evolution while identifying a fifth discrete entity within the mythological hierarchy of what Harold Bloom has characterized as a "mythopoeic trilogy" (36). Concurrently, I examined the ongoing debate concerning Shelley's influences, as well as the early formation of his personality, as it pertains to the poems in question, and his fascination ...


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