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On Writing Neo-Victorian Fiction: James Miranda Barry (1999) Sophie And The And The Sibyl: A Victorian Romance (2015), 2019 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

On Writing Neo-Victorian Fiction: James Miranda Barry (1999) Sophie And The And The Sibyl: A Victorian Romance (2015)

The George Eliot Review

This is the text of the Forty-Fourth George Eliot Memorial Lecture delivered at the Chilvers Coton Heritage Centre on J 0 October, 2015. An extended version of this article will appear in late 2016 or early 2017 as an interview/essay in the series 'anglistik & englischunterricht': Christina Flotmann and Anna Lienen (eds.), Victorian Ideologies in Contemporary British Culture, Heidelberg: Winter Verlag.

My first historical novel - lames Miranda Barry (1999) was not born a Neo-Victorian novel, but became one. And it had a very personal link to my own life. Barry was a nineteenth-century colonial doctor and medical reformer, who had ...


Embracing Foreignness: Transplanting, Trans-Nationalizing, And Translating The Stranger In Kazuo Ishiguro’S Works, Suguru Ikeda 2019 Connecticut College

Embracing Foreignness: Transplanting, Trans-Nationalizing, And Translating The Stranger In Kazuo Ishiguro’S Works, Suguru Ikeda

English Honors Papers

No abstract provided.


Mrs. Meyrick's Cat, Derek Miller 2019 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Mrs. Meyrick's Cat, Derek Miller

The George Eliot Review

'''Great God!" the words escaped Deronda' as he watched the just-prevented-from-drowning Mirah. 'The old thought had come now with a new impetus of mingled feeling, and urged that exclamation in which both East and West have for ages concentrated their awe in the presence of inexorable calamity.'!

Among those who welcome Mirah to Mrs. Meyrick's household is the cat Hafiz, seen by Deronda as it 'came forward with tail erect and rubbed himself against her ankles', an Eastern moment accompanying Mirah's entrance into the Meyrick family. Hafiz is later to purr as Mirah starts to tell her story ...


The Desire To Escape And The Inability To Follow Through In James Joyce’S Dubliners, Alyssa M. Wheatley 2018 University of New Orleans, New Orleans

The Desire To Escape And The Inability To Follow Through In James Joyce’S Dubliners, Alyssa M. Wheatley

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

In my research, I will examine James Joyce’s Dubliners as a collection of stories that is unified by an ongoing theme; escape or the desire to escape. In the collection, the want or need to escape serves a major purpose throughout the characters and their lives. This thesis explores five stories that share this theme in particular: “The Sisters,” “Eveline,” “Araby,” “An Encounter,” and “The Dead.” Each story will be discussed in the context of how each story progresses from a want to an actual escape. In addition, the thesis also considers how these stories exhibit a progression towards ...


Romantic Theology As Revelation Through Tom Bombadil And Goldberry In Tolkien’S The Lord Of The Rings, Brandon Best 2018 Augsburg University

Romantic Theology As Revelation Through Tom Bombadil And Goldberry In Tolkien’S The Lord Of The Rings, Brandon Best

Augsburg Honors Review

In J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, Tom Bombadil initially appears to be merely an eccentric, episodic character. Yet, upon close reading his enchanting spirit embodies moral significance throughout the trilogy when members in the war against Sauron recall his spirit in moments of hope and despair. Though he only appears to the Hobbits within the Old Forest, Bombadil represents ideals present throughout the entire story. As Tolkien wrote, “[Bombadil] represents something that I feel important, though I would not be prepared to analyze the feeling precisely. I would not, however, have left him in, if ...


Frankenstein: A Feminist Interpretation Of Gender Construction, Jackie Docka 2018 Augsburg University

Frankenstein: A Feminist Interpretation Of Gender Construction, Jackie Docka

Augsburg Honors Review

There is a long history of exploring Frankenstein through a feminist lens. A historical examination that explores Mary Shelley’s life and the literature that influenced her writing is key to understanding the feminist elements of Frankenstein. Additionally, this paper will call upon Judith Butler’s concept of gender performativity to examine the ways in which Victor’s monster constructs his own gender identity based upon his creator’s own flawed masculinity. Victor’s gender expression is defined by the time period in which he was created and also by the masculine literature of the time. While masculine literature helped ...


Meera Atkinson. The Poetics Of Transgenerational Trauma. Bloomsbury, 2017., Katie Lally 2018 University of California, Santa Cruz

Meera Atkinson. The Poetics Of Transgenerational Trauma. Bloomsbury, 2017., Katie Lally

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

Review of Meera Atkinson. The Poetics of Transgenerational Trauma. Bloomsbury, 2017.


How The ‘Abortion Miracle’ Motif In Medieval Irish Hagiographies Structured Gender Roles In Relation To Female Reproductivity And Sexual Sin, Lora Lynn Horner 2018 University of North Dakota

How The ‘Abortion Miracle’ Motif In Medieval Irish Hagiographies Structured Gender Roles In Relation To Female Reproductivity And Sexual Sin, Lora Lynn Horner

Essential Studies UNDergraduate Showcase

Four Irish Saints are accredited to performing abortions, otherwise known as the ‘Abortion Miracle’ motif. These four Saints are St. Brigid of Kildare, Ciarán of Saigir, Áed mac Bricc, and Cainnech of Aghoboe. In each of these four Saints lives they share a similar motif in which they bless a mother’s womb resulting in the mother no longer being pregnant. These ‘abortion miracles’ created structured gender roles in which a masculine figure would partake in the intervention of a female and a female’s reproductivity. The intervention of the Saints would come when the women would start to become ...


“I’Ve Been Given The Wrong Mother:” Reconsidering Absent Mothers In Postmodern British Literature, Amanda G. Sawyers 2018 East Tennessee State University

“I’Ve Been Given The Wrong Mother:” Reconsidering Absent Mothers In Postmodern British Literature, Amanda G. Sawyers

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Nineteenth-century British authors, in particular, Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, and Jane Austen, often turned to orphaned children as a means to drive the plot of their novels. While struggles such as displacement were often accurately depicted, the abovementioned authors and their contemporaries often glossed over or completely disregarded the trauma and psychological implications felt by these orphans. As psychology gained prominence as a discipline through the works of Sigmund Freud and others, modern British literature saw a shift in its consideration of orphans and, additionally, emotionally absent mothers. This thesis will examine three modern British novels; Ian McEwan’s Atonement ...


Echoes Of War: The Great War’S Impact On Literature, Samuel R. Williams 2018 University of Minnesota - Twin Cities

Echoes Of War: The Great War’S Impact On Literature, Samuel R. Williams

The Great Lakes Journal of Undergraduate History

This paper examines the works produced by: Erich Maria Remarque, Ernest Hemingway, C.S. Lewis, and J.R.R. Tolkien, specifically to show how their writings recorded and translated the experiences of soldiers during World War I, and their struggle to assimilate into civilian society afterward. By examining authors and novels from varying geographic and national background, common themes of bitterness, trauma, and disillusionment are found in men that fought on both sides of the conflict. Literature’s reflection of these scars appears in the lived experiences woven into the writings by the authors, and the reactions of the wider ...


A Critical Exploration Of Costume Design Possibilities In Tolkien’S Legendarium, M. Grace Costello 2018 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

A Critical Exploration Of Costume Design Possibilities In Tolkien’S Legendarium, M. Grace Costello

Apparel Merchandising and Product Development Undergraduate Honors Theses

Tolkien’s Legendarium has in many ways codified modern fantasy. Illustrations and film adaptations of it have had far-reaching consequences on popular culture, building an 80-year tradition of visual depictions of Tolkienesque fantasy. Particularly, Elven characters are usually depicted wearing costume inspired by Victorian notions of Western medieval costume. In this paper I seek to approach the design of original costume for the Ñoldor from a different perspective, free from the established traditions of other designers’ and illustrators’ work.

The preliminary research focuses on searching the source materials of the Silmarillion and select texts from the Histories of Middle Earth ...


Immortal Melancholia: A Psychoanalytical Study Of Byronic Heroes, Kathryn Frazell 2018 Dominican University of California

Immortal Melancholia: A Psychoanalytical Study Of Byronic Heroes, Kathryn Frazell

Master's Theses and Capstone Projects

This culminating project examines Byronic heroes using psychoanalytic theory across four case studies in media, including classic literature, theater, film, and television. The Byronic hero is a literary archetype inspired by the poet George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824). Typical characteristics include angst, arrogance, cunning intelligence, criminality, desire, passion, dominance, and otherness. The characters I have chosen to study include Mr. Rochester from Jane Eyre (1847), the Phantom from the 2004 film The Phantom of the Opera, James Bond from the 2012 film Skyfall, and Damon Salvatore from the hit television series The Vampire Diaries (2009-2017). Through examining the actions of ...


The Early History Of "Why Should We Idly Waste Our Prime", 2018 Selected Works

The Early History Of "Why Should We Idly Waste Our Prime"

Patrick Scott

Discusses varying editorial opinions on the origin and authorship of the radical song, "Why Should We Idly Waste Our Prime," first included in a Burns edition in the 1830s, and undertakes textual comparison between a number of versions of the song printed in the mid-1790s and later, in London, Belfast, and Newcastle, to suggest the ways in which such songs might be adapted and modified to fit changing political circumstances. Current version an unedited prepublication text, not in final form or with pagination.


Review Of Charlotte Lennox: An Independent Mind By Susan Carlile, Alexis McQuigge 2018 University of Regina

Review Of Charlotte Lennox: An Independent Mind By Susan Carlile, Alexis Mcquigge

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

This article reviews Susan Carlile's recent biography of Charlotte Lennox, Charlotte Lennox: An Independent Mind. Because much of Lennox's life story, and many of her works, remain mysterious to contemporary readers, Carlile's work highlights some unique and important aspects of the life of a - at least in the eighteenth- and nineteenth-centuries, a celebrated literary minds. Carlile's work is an important and necessary addition to the study of women's writing in the period, and contributes a great deal to those studying the works of Charlotte Lennox.


Review Of Royal Shakespeare Company Production Of Mary Pix’S The Beau Defeated, Retitled The Fantastic Follies Of Mrs. Rich, Aparna Gollapudi 2018 Colorado State University - Fort Collins

Review Of Royal Shakespeare Company Production Of Mary Pix’S The Beau Defeated, Retitled The Fantastic Follies Of Mrs. Rich, Aparna Gollapudi

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

Jo Davies’s reprise of Mary Pix’s comedy The Beau Defeated, Or The Lucky Younger Brother,performed by the Royal Shakespeare Company at Swan Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon under the title The Fantastic Follies of Mrs. Rich refocuses the comedy from its original engagement with primogeniture and middling class masculinity towards the female characters. It also diffuses Pix’s Whiggish moralism in Mrs. Rich's portrayal, highlighting instead her energy and verve. Overall, a very successful production, the performance is more Restoration comedy than the transitional work that Pix's play was when it opened in 1700.


Editing Aphra Behn In The Digital Age: An Interview With Gillian Wright And Alan Hogarth, Laura Runge, Gillian Wright, Alan Hogarth 2018 University of South Florida

Editing Aphra Behn In The Digital Age: An Interview With Gillian Wright And Alan Hogarth, Laura Runge, Gillian Wright, Alan Hogarth

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

This interview provides a view of the work in progress for the Cambridge University Press edition of the Complete Works of Aphra Behn. Gillian Wright serves as a general editor (with Elaine Hobby, Claire Bowditch, and Mel Evans) as well as the volume editor for Behn’s poetry. Alan Hogarth is the Postdoctoral Research Associate working with Mel Evans on the computational stylistics and author attribution testing. The discussion focuses on the scope and principles of editing the poetry of Aphra Behn, the role of stylometry in establishing the corpus, the status of work, a few particular poems, and some ...


Reading Her Queenly Coiffure: A Collaborative Approach To The Study Of Marie-Antoinette's Hairstyles, Hélène Bilis, Jenifer Bartle, Laura M. O'Brien, Ruth R. Rogers 2018 Wellesley College

Reading Her Queenly Coiffure: A Collaborative Approach To The Study Of Marie-Antoinette's Hairstyles, Hélène Bilis, Jenifer Bartle, Laura M. O'Brien, Ruth R. Rogers

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

Four colleagues--a faculty member, a digital services librarian, a research librarian, and a curator of Special Collections--take turns describing their role in creating an undergraduate student project around an eighteenth-century almanac that belonged to Marie-Antoinette. In recounting the steps taken, the collaborative process, the student research, and the analysis of the contents of the Trésor des Grâces almanac, we share the lessons learned for completing a digital exhibit over the course of one semester.


New Lines: Mary Ann Yates, The Orphan Of China, And The New She-Tragedy, Elaine McGirr 2018 University of Bristol

New Lines: Mary Ann Yates, The Orphan Of China, And The New She-Tragedy, Elaine Mcgirr

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

This essay demonstrates a significant break in eighteenth-century tragedy from tales of fallen women begging (the audience) for forgiveness and redemption to a different kind of she-tragedy, in which the heroine is neither fallen nor sexually desired, but rather transcends nation and politics with the “natural” moral force of maternal love. I argue that this shift was made possible/legible by Susannah Cibber’s ill-health, which forced Arthur Murphy to reconceive The Orphan of China’s heroine and allowed a rival actress, Mary Ann Yates, to step into this new role and to establish a tragic ‘line’ defined in opposition ...


Learning To Read: Reality, Fiction, And Reading In The Female Quixote, Zachary McCollum 2018 University of North Georgia

Learning To Read: Reality, Fiction, And Reading In The Female Quixote, Zachary Mccollum

Georgia Undergraduate Research Conference (GURC)

Charlotte Lennox’s novel The Female Quixote chronicles the adventures of a young woman who, like Don Quixote, has derived her worldview from reading romances and resultantly misinterprets the world around her. On its face, the novel may seem like a straightforward warning against the potentially hazardous effects of fiction, and much previous criticism of the novel has interpreted it as such; however, reading this novel purely as a cautionary tale risks overlooking some of the nuances present in Lennox’s narrative, and I sought to avoid this reduction in my approach. Indeed, I argue that the novel may be ...


Victor’S Dual Diagnosis: An Exploration Of Mental Illness In Frankensteinian Times, Elizabeth Tretter 2018 Murray State University

Victor’S Dual Diagnosis: An Exploration Of Mental Illness In Frankensteinian Times, Elizabeth Tretter

Scholars Week

Victor’s Dual Diagnosis: An Exploration of Mental Illness in Frankensteinian Times

Before the advances of modern psychology, treatment of the mentally insane consisted of cruel and torturous methods that involved beating, starving, or bleeding patients often until the point of death. It was not until the late eighteenth century that a revolutionary kind of moral treatment was introduced by William Tuke, an English Quaker and founder of The Friends’ Retreat. Founded in 1879, the small retreat in York set the precedent for future asylums with their meticulous record keeping that included their own standardized diagnoses and symptoms of mental ...


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