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A Woman Wielding Words: The Role Of The Woman-Poet And Woman-Prophet Fedelm In The Táin Bó Cúailnge, Laura Steblay 2019 University of Minnesota - Morris

A Woman Wielding Words: The Role Of The Woman-Poet And Woman-Prophet Fedelm In The Táin Bó Cúailnge, Laura Steblay

Scholarly Horizons: University of Minnesota, Morris Undergraduate Journal

The character Fedelm is the only woman described as a poet in the early Irish epic the Táin Bó Cúailnge, and her prophecy which tells of the boy-hero Cúchulainn commences the tale. This paper examines Fedelm’s presence in the tale as a prophetic force in her role as a woman-poet and woman-prophet, as a literary reflection of Cúchulainn’s mentor Scathach, and as a visual parallel to Cúchulainn himself. Ultimately, it is not only Fedelm’s prediction that establishes the legendary Cúchulainn’s place in the narrative, but her very presence as a character provides a literary embodiment of ...


Fairy In The Faerie Queene: Making Elizabeth Irish, Sarah Severson 2019 University of Minnesota, Morris

Fairy In The Faerie Queene: Making Elizabeth Irish, Sarah Severson

Scholarly Horizons: University of Minnesota, Morris Undergraduate Journal

Queen Elizabeth I defied the societal and political expectations of her time by remaining an unmarried, female monarch for the entirety of her rule. She was glorified by many, including Edmund Spenser, who dedicated his epic poem The Faerie Queene to her. Yet tensions surrounding Queen Elizabeth’s unmarried, powerful status infiltrate Spenser’s work through the repeated loss of female power, which seems in conflict with Spenser’s supposed idealization of his monarch. Curiously, various female figures in The Faerie Queene can be linked to Irish sovereignty goddesses, female figures who have power over Irish land and transfer this ...


A Giant Problem In Book Five Of The Faerie Queene, Corinne McCumber 2019 University of Minnesota - Morris

A Giant Problem In Book Five Of The Faerie Queene, Corinne Mccumber

Scholarly Horizons: University of Minnesota, Morris Undergraduate Journal

In Book Five of The Faerie Queene, Edmund Spenser has no qualms about killing giants, who appear at multiple points in the text. Spenser has his narrator explicitly call three foes giants: the Egalitarian “Gyant,” (V.ii.30.1), Geryoneo (V.xi.9.5), and Grantorto (V.xii.15.2). Other giants weave through the text, and all perish--though their deaths signal more than simple defeat in combat. Previous scholarly examinations have linked giants to classical and biblical usurpers of both God and the State. Yet giants are also, as I show, uniquely connected to Ireland. Because of this connection ...


Bodies, Blood, And Manure: The Rhetoric Of Nutrient Cycling In Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene And A View Of The State Of Ireland, Bailey Kemp 2019 University of Minnesota, Morris

Bodies, Blood, And Manure: The Rhetoric Of Nutrient Cycling In Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene And A View Of The State Of Ireland, Bailey Kemp

Scholarly Horizons: University of Minnesota, Morris Undergraduate Journal

Although the term “ecology” did not exist when Edmund Spenser was writing, forms of ecological understanding were present during Spenser’s time. Therefore, the modern phrase “nutrient cycling” provides a useful vocabulary with which to discuss two of Spenser’s most prominent works: The Faerie Queene and A View of the State of Ireland. Throughout these texts, Spenser exhibits an awareness of the cyclical patterns that govern the natural world, especially regarding the rich Irish soil. While emphasizing the fertility of the Irish landscape serves to advance his colonial agenda, Spenser’s apparent ecological awareness also poses a paradox: the ...


Ilai Rowner. The Event: Literature And Theory. U Of Nebraska P, 2015., Dane Stalcup 2019 Wagner College

Ilai Rowner. The Event: Literature And Theory. U Of Nebraska P, 2015., Dane Stalcup

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

Review of Ilai Rowner. The Event: Literature and Theory. U of Nebraska P, 2015. xv + 311 pp.


Desire, Frustration, And Resolution In The Ending(S) Of Troilus And Criseyde, Kenny Martin 2019 Southern Methodist University

Desire, Frustration, And Resolution In The Ending(S) Of Troilus And Criseyde, Kenny Martin

SMU Journal of Undergraduate Research

This essay analyzes the final stanzas of Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde in order to challenge the critical commonplace that the poem’s ending is fraught, fragmented, unsatisfactory, or ultimately inconclusive. It questions the traditional view that the ending is a conspicuous departure from the poetic mode of the earlier poem, as well as the view that the final stanzas are dominated by an ideological struggle between earthly and divine love. Through a close reading of the final five stanzas of the poem—and with particular attention to their echoes throughout the larger work— the essay seeks to elucidate how ...


"Few Have Gained Such A Victory:" A Defense Of Boromir In The Lord Of The Rings, Kayla Beebout 2019 Asbury University

"Few Have Gained Such A Victory:" A Defense Of Boromir In The Lord Of The Rings, Kayla Beebout

Journal of Tolkien Research

Boromir’s character in The Lord of the Rings is sometimes remembered chiefly for his brief defeat by the Ring. Though this is a simple way to identify his character, it does not consider his subsequent redemption and the goodness he demonstrates in other parts of the story. This article seeks to provide a more complete portrait of the Steward’s son. The first portion examines Boromir’s words and actions throughout the story, good and bad. The second portion discusses his brief fall, including the temptation of the Ring and the significance of Boromir’s redemption. Examples of other ...


Hrothgar And Wealhtheow: An Onomastic Approach To A Story Of Good Governance, D. Marie Nelson 2019 University of Florida

Hrothgar And Wealhtheow: An Onomastic Approach To A Story Of Good Governance, D. Marie Nelson

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Place-Names And Politics In The Awntyrs Off Arthure, Andrew Breeze 2019 Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona

Place-Names And Politics In The Awntyrs Off Arthure, Andrew Breeze

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Multilingual Moomins: Examining The Translation Of Tove Jansson’S Nonsense Character Names From Swedish To English And Finnish, Janine A E Strandberg 2019 University of Groningen

Multilingual Moomins: Examining The Translation Of Tove Jansson’S Nonsense Character Names From Swedish To English And Finnish, Janine A E Strandberg

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Permanent Functions Of Characters’ Proper Names In Harry Potter, Martyna Gibka 2019 Koszalin University of Technology

Permanent Functions Of Characters’ Proper Names In Harry Potter, Martyna Gibka

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


"Facts Are Chiels"" Some New (?) Facts (?) About Robert Burns, Patrick Scott 2019 University of South Carolina - Columbia

"Facts Are Chiels"" Some New (?) Facts (?) About Robert Burns, Patrick Scott

Patrick Scott

A talk on an invited topic for the 2019 annual Burns conference, sponsored by the Centre for Robert Burns Studies, University of Glasgow, at the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum, Alloway, on January 12, 2019. Among topics discussed are variant texts of the song "yestre'en I had a pint o wine" [The gowden Locks of Anna], the long-lost first newspaper publication of the disputed short poem "Delia: An Ode," and the date, background and manuscript sources for "Fragment: Esopus to Maria." The talk is not fully referenced, and only selected powerpoint slides are included, but fuller references will be provided ...


Embracing Foreignness: Transplanting, Trans-Nationalizing, And Translating The Stranger In Kazuo Ishiguro’S Works, Suguru Ikeda 2019 Connecticut College

Embracing Foreignness: Transplanting, Trans-Nationalizing, And Translating The Stranger In Kazuo Ishiguro’S Works, Suguru Ikeda

English Honors Papers

No abstract provided.


"The Double Sorwe Of Troilus": Experimentation Of The Chivalric And Tragic Genres In Chaucer And Shakespeare, Rena Patel 2019 Scripps College

"The Double Sorwe Of Troilus": Experimentation Of The Chivalric And Tragic Genres In Chaucer And Shakespeare, Rena Patel

Scripps Senior Theses

The tumulus tale of Troilus and his lover Cressida has left readers intrigued in renditions written by both Geoffrey Chaucer and William Shakespeare due to their subversive nature of the authors’ chosen generic forms. Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde challenges the expectations and limitations of the narrative of the chivalric romance. Shakespeare took the story and turned Troilus and Cressida into one of his famous “problem plays” by challenging his audience’s expectations of the tragic genre. I endeavor to draw attention to the ways in which both Chaucer and Shakespeare use the conventions of the chivalric romance and tragedy ...


Monstrosity As A Problem Of Moral Proximity In Shakespeare’S Othello, Kyle Ward 2018 Brigham Young University

Monstrosity As A Problem Of Moral Proximity In Shakespeare’S Othello, Kyle Ward

All Student Publications

Abstract

In Othello, Shakespeare explores the idea of monstrosity through his titular character. This paper argues that Othello exemplifies the idea that monstrosity is not an inherent evil, but rather that it is a problem of Moral Proximity. The Problem of Moral Proximity, as it is explained in the paper, is the idea that good and evil are the moderation of or corruption of neutral traits. This paper not only argues that monstrosity is one of these neutral qualities, but also explores how Iago corrupts this monstrosity to bring about Othello's downfall.


The Desire To Escape And The Inability To Follow Through In James Joyce’S Dubliners, Alyssa M. Wheatley 2018 University of New Orleans, New Orleans

The Desire To Escape And The Inability To Follow Through In James Joyce’S Dubliners, Alyssa M. Wheatley

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

In my research, I will examine James Joyce’s Dubliners as a collection of stories that is unified by an ongoing theme; escape or the desire to escape. In the collection, the want or need to escape serves a major purpose throughout the characters and their lives. This thesis explores five stories that share this theme in particular: “The Sisters,” “Eveline,” “Araby,” “An Encounter,” and “The Dead.” Each story will be discussed in the context of how each story progresses from a want to an actual escape. In addition, the thesis also considers how these stories exhibit a progression towards ...


Romantic Theology As Revelation Through Tom Bombadil And Goldberry In Tolkien’S The Lord Of The Rings, Brandon Best 2018 Augsburg University

Romantic Theology As Revelation Through Tom Bombadil And Goldberry In Tolkien’S The Lord Of The Rings, Brandon Best

Augsburg Honors Review

In J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, Tom Bombadil initially appears to be merely an eccentric, episodic character. Yet, upon close reading his enchanting spirit embodies moral significance throughout the trilogy when members in the war against Sauron recall his spirit in moments of hope and despair. Though he only appears to the Hobbits within the Old Forest, Bombadil represents ideals present throughout the entire story. As Tolkien wrote, “[Bombadil] represents something that I feel important, though I would not be prepared to analyze the feeling precisely. I would not, however, have left him in, if ...


Frankenstein: A Feminist Interpretation Of Gender Construction, Jackie Docka 2018 Augsburg University

Frankenstein: A Feminist Interpretation Of Gender Construction, Jackie Docka

Augsburg Honors Review

There is a long history of exploring Frankenstein through a feminist lens. A historical examination that explores Mary Shelley’s life and the literature that influenced her writing is key to understanding the feminist elements of Frankenstein. Additionally, this paper will call upon Judith Butler’s concept of gender performativity to examine the ways in which Victor’s monster constructs his own gender identity based upon his creator’s own flawed masculinity. Victor’s gender expression is defined by the time period in which he was created and also by the masculine literature of the time. While masculine literature helped ...


Meera Atkinson. The Poetics Of Transgenerational Trauma. Bloomsbury, 2017., Katie Lally 2018 University of California, Santa Cruz

Meera Atkinson. The Poetics Of Transgenerational Trauma. Bloomsbury, 2017., Katie Lally

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

Review of Meera Atkinson. The Poetics of Transgenerational Trauma. Bloomsbury, 2017.


How The ‘Abortion Miracle’ Motif In Medieval Irish Hagiographies Structured Gender Roles In Relation To Female Reproductivity And Sexual Sin, Lora Lynn Horner 2018 University of North Dakota

How The ‘Abortion Miracle’ Motif In Medieval Irish Hagiographies Structured Gender Roles In Relation To Female Reproductivity And Sexual Sin, Lora Lynn Horner

Essential Studies UNDergraduate Showcase

Four Irish Saints are accredited to performing abortions, otherwise known as the ‘Abortion Miracle’ motif. These four Saints are St. Brigid of Kildare, Ciarán of Saigir, Áed mac Bricc, and Cainnech of Aghoboe. In each of these four Saints lives they share a similar motif in which they bless a mother’s womb resulting in the mother no longer being pregnant. These ‘abortion miracles’ created structured gender roles in which a masculine figure would partake in the intervention of a female and a female’s reproductivity. The intervention of the Saints would come when the women would start to become ...


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