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The Second Pen, Nicholas D. Brennan 2017 CUNY Hunter College

The Second Pen, Nicholas D. Brennan

School of Arts & Sciences Theses

"The Second Pen" evaluates the historical relevancy of prevalent monikers for William Shakespeare-- namely, "The Bard," "Swan of Avon," and "Upstart Crow." While Brennan finds the general concept of the moniker to encapsulate Shakespeare's current historical legacy, he equally finds the aforementioned monikers to misrepresent this. Brennan offers "The Second Pen" as a moniker for Shakespeare that redresses the distortions of the others. He concentrates his defense of its relevancy around a defense of William Shakespeare as the "second pen" which Ben Jonson's 1605 Sejanus quarto names as a collaborator in the writing of a preceding stage version ...


Romanticism And Christianity, Erin R. Toal 2017 Liberty University

Romanticism And Christianity, Erin R. Toal

The Kabod

The fervency of Romantic notions sometimes caused the Romantics to stray from Christianity; nonetheless, Romanticism offers many insights that can enhance Christian life and inspire worship of God.


Roots And Repercussions Of Romantic Feeling: Sensation And Affect In The Poetry Of Samuel Taylor Coleridge And William Wordsworth, Mary K. Cotter 2016 City University of New York (CUNY)

Roots And Repercussions Of Romantic Feeling: Sensation And Affect In The Poetry Of Samuel Taylor Coleridge And William Wordsworth, Mary K. Cotter

School of Arts & Sciences Theses

Enlightenment emphasis on rationalism in philosophy and the arts prefigures Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s and William Wordsworth’s Romantic recovery of a subject’s empirical relationship to nature and the phenomenal world. Coleridge and Wordsworth respond to philosophical precedents that emphasize rationalism and the autonomy of a subject while introducing empiricism and sensation as primary components of the speaker’s experience. The poets delineate a fluid shift from the Enlightenment to Romanticism through an interchangeable reliance on Kantian and Burkean philosophical methods. The philosophy of Immanuel Kant follows the Cartesian cogito toward a similar end of reducing human experience to ...


Edinburgh Monuments, The Literary Canon, And Cultural Nationalism: A Comparative Perspective, Silvia Mergenthal 2016 University of Konstantz

Edinburgh Monuments, The Literary Canon, And Cultural Nationalism: A Comparative Perspective, Silvia Mergenthal

Studies in Scottish Literature

Building on comparative studies of the "memory landscapes" of cities and monuments, describes three different monument series in Edinburgh, the Canongate Wall at the Scottish Parliament building at Holyrood, the flagstone quotations in Makar's Court near the Writers' Museum, and the grouped herms in the Edinburgh Business Park; discusses how the authors included in each series were selected and how each relates to the formal and informal Scottish literary canon; and briefly indicates what comparative scholarship suggests about the relation of such monuments to the development of cultural nationalism.


Mobbing, (Dis)Order And The Literary Pig In The Tale Of Colkelbie Sow, Pars Prima, Caitlin Flynn 2016 University of St Andrews

Mobbing, (Dis)Order And The Literary Pig In The Tale Of Colkelbie Sow, Pars Prima, Caitlin Flynn

Studies in Scottish Literature

Sets the portrayal of the pig in the anonymous Scots fifteenth-century poem The Tale of Colkelbie Sow in the context of medieval fears of social disorder and mob rule, drawing on medieval accounts of the criminal trials of unruly pigs and other animals, and recent discussions of Scottish and medieval literary humour.


Alexander Arbuthnot And The Lyric In Post-Reformation Scotland, Joanna Martin 2016 University of Nottingham

Alexander Arbuthnot And The Lyric In Post-Reformation Scotland, Joanna Martin

Studies in Scottish Literature

Presents the first critical discussion of manuscript poems in the Maitland Quarto attributable to Alexander Arbuthnot (1538-1583), the first Protestant principal of King's College, Aberdeen; gives detailed discussion of attribution and textual issues; and discusses the effects of religious change on Arbuthnot's writing of amatory, ethical and devotional lyric in post-Reformation Scotland.


'Rebellious Highlanders': The Reception Of Corsica In The Edinburgh Periodical Press, 1730-1800, Rhona Brown 2016 University of Glasgow

'Rebellious Highlanders': The Reception Of Corsica In The Edinburgh Periodical Press, 1730-1800, Rhona Brown

Studies in Scottish Literature

Examines the way Scottish periodicals, especially the Weekly Magazine and the Caledonian Mercury, reported and discussed the nationalist resistance in Corsica against first Genoese and then French rule; recalibrates the role of James Boswell in shaping Scottish opinion about Corsica, especially in his Account of Corsica (1768); notes the parallels made by Scottish commentators between the Corsican resistance under Pascal Paoli and the Scottish highlands, especially the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745; and suggests the value of looking at the distinctive responses of Scottish periodicals, not just the print networks based on London.


Scotland And The Caribbean, Jo DuRant 2016 University of Glasgow

Scotland And The Caribbean, Jo Durant

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses (and summarizes) Michael Morris's recent book Scotland and the Caribbean, c. 1740-1833, concluding that it should be welcomed, not only as an introduction to specific writers, but as a good introduction to recent debates on the legacy of Caribbean slavery, as seen from a Scottish perspective.


Review Of The Bluestocking Archive, Emory Women Writers Resource Project, And Women’S Travel Writing, 1780-1840: A Bio-Bibliographical Database, Megan Peiser 2016 University of Missouri

Review Of The Bluestocking Archive, Emory Women Writers Resource Project, And Women’S Travel Writing, 1780-1840: A Bio-Bibliographical Database, Megan Peiser

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

Review of The Bluestocking Archive, Emory Women Writers Resource Project, and Women's Travel Writing 1780-1840.


Review Of Sigrund Haude And Melinda S. Zook, Eds, Challenging Orthodoxies: The Social And Cultural Worlds Of Early Modern Women: Essays Presented To Hilda L. Smith, Emma Major 2016 University of York, UK

Review Of Sigrund Haude And Melinda S. Zook, Eds, Challenging Orthodoxies: The Social And Cultural Worlds Of Early Modern Women: Essays Presented To Hilda L. Smith, Emma Major

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

This article reviews Sigrun Haude and Melinda S. Zook, eds, Challenging Orthodoxies: The Social and Cultural Worlds of Early Modern Women: Essays Presented to Hilda L. Smith.


Review Of Joellen Delucia, A Feminine Enlightenment: British Women Writers And The Philosophy Of Progress, Nicole Pohl 2016 Oxford Brookes University

Review Of Joellen Delucia, A Feminine Enlightenment: British Women Writers And The Philosophy Of Progress, Nicole Pohl

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

Review of JoEllen DeLucia's A Feminine Enlightenment: British Women Writers and the Philosophy of Progress, 1759-1820.


Review Of Rivka Swenson, Essential Scots And The Idea Of Unionism In Anglo-Scottish Literature, 1603-1832, Rhona Brown 2016 University of Glasgow

Review Of Rivka Swenson, Essential Scots And The Idea Of Unionism In Anglo-Scottish Literature, 1603-1832, Rhona Brown

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

Review: Rivka Swenson, Essential Scots and the Idea of Unionism in Anglo-Scottish Literature, 1603-1832


“I Know You Want It”: Teaching The Blurred Lines Of Eighteenth-Century Rape Culture, Emily J. Dowd-Arrow, Sarah R. Creel 2016 Bainbridge State College

“I Know You Want It”: Teaching The Blurred Lines Of Eighteenth-Century Rape Culture, Emily J. Dowd-Arrow, Sarah R. Creel

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

“‘I Know You Want It’: Teaching the Blurred Lines of Eighteenth-Century Rape Culture” is a collaborative pedagogical article that addresses the problem of so-called “post-feminism” in the contemporary college classroom by way of a comparative approach to eighteenth-century literature. Specifically, we contextualize and compare the early and late work of Eliza Haywood with current cultural debates and events in order to demonstrate not only the relevance of Haywood and eighteenth-century writers like her, but the importance of continuing the feminist conversation. The article provides texts, readings, and discussion points for consideration, as well as links to relevant contemporary issues and ...


Maurice's Love, Peggy Wood 2016 Chapman University

Maurice's Love, Peggy Wood

Student Research Day Abstracts and Posters

“By linking their love to the past he linked it to the present” (Forster 745).

E. M. Forster’s Maurice is a widely read and taught text that features homosexuality in Edwardian England. The focus of this thesis is an in-depth analysis of Maurice’s character, with a specific emphasis on the character’s coming out process. The coming out process is still a significant issue in today’s world. Hate crimes, ostracism, and many other negatives can be associated with the coming out process that is not entirely different from what Maurice Hall faced. This statement is easily supported ...


Religion In Sense And Sensibility, Erin R. Toal 2016 Liberty University

Religion In Sense And Sensibility, Erin R. Toal

The Kabod

Jane Austen’s first major novel that was published, Sense and Sensibility, exemplifies the shifting perspectives in religion during the Georgian period by exploring the virtues of its title through the lenses of the Anglicanism of Georgian England. This paper argues that Sense and Sensibility reflects Jane Austen’s worldview and identifies how it stems from the Neoclassical and Romantic fusion present in her religious belief.


Virginia Woolf’S Fictional Biographies, Orlando And Flush, As Prefigures Of Postmodernism, Jacob C. Castle 2016 East Tennessee State University

Virginia Woolf’S Fictional Biographies, Orlando And Flush, As Prefigures Of Postmodernism, Jacob C. Castle

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This thesis examines the way in which the fictional biographies of Virginia Woolf, Orlando and Flush, prefigure central tenets of postmodern fiction. To demonstrate the postmodern elements present in Orlando and Flush, this thesis focuses on how the fictional biographies exhibit three postmodern characteristics: concern for historiography, extensive use of parody, and the denaturalization of cultural assumptions. Born from Woolf’s desire to revolutionize biography by incorporating elements of fiction alongside historical fact, these two novels parallel later works of historiographic metafiction in several key respects. Woolf’s extensive use of parody in Orlando and Flush prefigures how postmodern parody ...


Finding Inspiration In Darkness: The Exploration Of Obscurity In Romanticism Through The Works Of Lord Byron And Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Sarah E. Seal 2016 East Tennessee State University

Finding Inspiration In Darkness: The Exploration Of Obscurity In Romanticism Through The Works Of Lord Byron And Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Sarah E. Seal

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Through the works of Lord Byron and Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, I explored the function of the themes of darkness and obscurity in Romanticism. There was a clear connection between the inclusion of these themes and the rejection of the Enlightenment period, which is what I focused on in this thesis. I discovered that the Romantics found inspiration and beauty in the darker, stranger aspects of the natural world, while rejecting the logical and rational beliefs of the Enlightenment.


Patristic Precedent And Vernacular Innovation: The Practice And Theory Of Anglo-Saxon Translation, Andrew Timothy Eichel 2016 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Patristic Precedent And Vernacular Innovation: The Practice And Theory Of Anglo-Saxon Translation, Andrew Timothy Eichel

Doctoral Dissertations

My dissertation investigates Anglo-Saxon translation and interpretation during the reign of King Alfred of Wessex in the ninth century, and the Benedictine Reform of the tenth and eleventh centuries. These two periods represent a time of renaissance in Anglo-Saxon England, when circumstance and ambition allowed for a number of impressive reformation enterprises, including increased dedication to education of both clerical orders and the laity, which therefore augmented the output of writing motivated by scholarly curiosity, ecclesiastical inquiry, and political strategizing. At these formative stages, translation emerged as perhaps the most critical task for the vernacular writers. The Latinate prestige culture ...


Sketches, Impressions And Confessions: Literature As Experiment In The Nineteenth Century, Andrew Ragsdale Lallier 2016 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Sketches, Impressions And Confessions: Literature As Experiment In The Nineteenth Century, Andrew Ragsdale Lallier

Doctoral Dissertations

In this dissertation, I argue for the existence and critical relevance of a program of experimental literature in the long nineteenth century, developed in the aesthetics of German Romanticism and adapted in a set of texts by Thomas De Quincey, Charles Dickens and George Eliot. My introduction positions this argument in context of larger debates concerning form, theory and literary capacity, provides points of connection between these authors, and outlines the most prominent features of experimental literature. In the first chapter, I present an unorthodox reading of Kant’s Critique of Judgment, accompanied by a brief account of the literary-critical ...


The Poet And The Polemist: Demystifying The Natural Law Theory Of John Milton, John J. Mazola 2016 CUNY Hunter College

The Poet And The Polemist: Demystifying The Natural Law Theory Of John Milton, John J. Mazola

School of Arts & Sciences Theses

A summation of the influences behind Milton's Natural Law theory as found in the works of Aristotle, Grotius, Hobbes, and Thomas Aquinas. The essay's intent is to uncover this important thread that runs through both Milton's Poetic Verse as well as his Polemic tracts.


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