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736 full-text articles. Page 11 of 11.

Sagp/Ssips 2010 Program, Anthony Preus 2010 Binghamton University

Sagp/Ssips 2010 Program, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

No abstract provided.


The Intelligible Creator-God And The Intelligent Soul Of The Cosmos In Plato’S Theology And Metaphysics, Jason G. Rheins 2010 University of Pennsylvania

The Intelligible Creator-God And The Intelligent Soul Of The Cosmos In Plato’S Theology And Metaphysics, Jason G. Rheins

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

ABSTRACT

THE INTELLIGIBLE CREATOR-GOD AND THE INTELLIGENT SOUL OF THE COSMOS IN PLATO’S THEOLOGY AND METAPHYSICS

Jason G. Rheins

Charles H. Kahn and Susan Sauvé Meyer

When Plato discusses the World-soul, cosmic intellect (nous), and the Demiurge, he approaches them theologically, i.e. as being the subjects of an account of the nature of the gods, but few works in the last half-century or more have addressed the ‘players’ in Plato’s theology as such. The major strata in the hierarchy of divine beings were referred to in the Neo-Platonist tradition as “hypostases”. My question is this: between intellect ...


Aristotle On Learning In De Anima Ii.5, John F. Bowin 2010 University of California, Santa Cruz

Aristotle On Learning In De Anima Ii.5, John F. Bowin

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Just as the coming to be of a substance may be described as either an extended process or the completion of an extended process depending on whether it is described as the coming to be of the composite or of the individual form, so the process of learning may be described as either an extended process or the completion of an extended process depending on whether it is described as the oscillation between states of truth and error or as the ‘settling down’ or cessation of this oscillation at the stage where knowledge has become a stable disposition (hexis). And ...


Intelligible Matter In Aristotle, John Thorp 2010 Western University

Intelligible Matter In Aristotle, John Thorp

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

The oxymoronic phrase ‘intelligible matter’ occurs three times in Aristotle. In two passages it has the same meaning; in the third the meaning seems radically different. This gives the impression that the Aristotelian language of metaphysics is distressingly slack. This paper argues, against the nearly unanimous voice of two millennia of commentaries, that ‘intelligible matter’ has the same meaning in all three loci. In doing so it develops a capital distinction that tightens up the apparatus of Aristotelian metaphysics.


Causation, Agency, And Law In Antiphon: On Some Subtleties In The Second Tetralogy, Joel Mann 2010 St. Norbert College

Causation, Agency, And Law In Antiphon: On Some Subtleties In The Second Tetralogy, Joel Mann

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

That no one can or should be convicted in a law court on pollution charges is, I suggest, the implicit message of Antiphon’s second Tetralogy. More than a mere rhetorical exercise, Antiphon offers us a rational and compelling critique of religious law and of legal responsibility generally. In so doing, he anticipates modern puzzles in the philosophy of law as well as some of their more sophisticated solutions. A work not only of ingenious skepticism but also of considerable subtlety, the second Tetralogy should be considered the product of a philosopher who made perhaps the most substantial extant contribution ...


Sagp Newsletter 2009/10.4 Pac, Anthony Preus 2010 Binghamton University

Sagp Newsletter 2009/10.4 Pac, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

No abstract provided.


What Aristotle Should Have Said About Megalopsychia, May Sim 2010 College of the Holy Cross

What Aristotle Should Have Said About Megalopsychia, May Sim

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Megalopsychia (the greatness of soul) also translated as pride, or magnanimity, is a virtue Aristotle attributes to the good person regarding his claim to be worthy of great things, namely, honor. Despite this definition, commentators like C. Rowe, H. Curzer, R. Polansky and J. Stover, all chose to de-emphasize the centrality of honor in Aristotle’s definition of megalopsychia. Aristotle’s assertion that honor is the greatest external good also seems to be in tension with megalopsychia as a virtue that is to be pursued for its own sake, not to mention its tension with his remark that friendship is ...


Against Hedonist Interpretations Of Plato's Protagoras, J. Clerk Shaw 2010 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Against Hedonist Interpretations Of Plato's Protagoras, J. Clerk Shaw

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

In this paper, I adapt one of the pro-hedonist strategies to anti-hedonist ends. Just as some prohedonists insist that Plato’s arguments against hedonism elsewhere do not touch the actual theory found in the Protagoras (again, PH), I argue that the most natural reading of PH is inconsistent with views found in purportedly earlier dialogues (especially the Apology and Crito) as well as in purportedly later dialogues (such as the Gorgias, Phaedo, and Republic). In section 1, I argue that PH focuses entirely on bodily goods and bads.11 Then, in section 2, I argue that this makes the relationship ...


Sagp Newsletter 2009/10.3 (Central Division), Anthony Preus 2010 Binghamton University

Sagp Newsletter 2009/10.3 (Central Division), Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Empirical And Dialogical Proofs Of God's Existence In Laws 10, Lewis Trelawny-Cassity 2010 Binghamton University--SUNY

Empirical And Dialogical Proofs Of God's Existence In Laws 10, Lewis Trelawny-Cassity

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Book 10 of the Laws is intended to prove that the gods exist, care for us, and are not persuaded by bribes (885b7-9). The arguments put forward concerning the gods in Book 10 are described as “our noblest and best prelude (kalliston te kai ariston prooimion) on behalf of the laws” (887c1). In this paper I want to investigate how Plato establishes the fact that nous, “god, in the correct sense, for the gods” (897b2), exists. Some scholars have noted the “empirical” character of Plato’s arguments for the existence of god in Laws 10. While empirical facts do provide ...


Saving The Life Of A Foolish Poet: Tacitus On Marcus Lepidus, Thrasea Paetus, And Political Action Under The Principate, Thomas E. Strunk 2010 Xavier University - Cincinnati

Saving The Life Of A Foolish Poet: Tacitus On Marcus Lepidus, Thrasea Paetus, And Political Action Under The Principate, Thomas E. Strunk

Faculty Scholarship

This paper explores Tacitus' representation of Thrasea Paetus. Preliminary to analyzing this portrayal, I discuss two passages often cited when exploring Tacitus' political thought, Agricola 42.4 and Annales 4.20. I reject the former's validity with regard to Thrasea and accept the latter as a starting point for comparing Tacitus' depictions of Marcus Lepidus and Thrasea. Tacitus' characterizations of Thrasea and Lepidus share the greatest resemblance in the trials of Antistius Sosianus and Clutorius Priscus, both of whom wrote verses offensive to the regime. Thrasea and Lepidus both came to the defense of their respective poet in an ...


A Philology Of Liberation: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. As A Reader Of The Classics, Thomas E. Strunk 2010 Xavier University - Cincinnati

A Philology Of Liberation: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. As A Reader Of The Classics, Thomas E. Strunk

Faculty Scholarship

This paper explores the intellectual relationship between Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the classics, particularly the works of Plato, Sophocles, and Aeschylus. Recognizing Dr. King as a reader of the classics is significant for two reasons: the classics played a formative role in Dr. King's development into a political activist and an intellectual of the first order; moreover, Dr. King shows us the way to read the classics. Dr. King did not read the classics in a pedantic or even academic manner, but for the purpose of liberation. Dr. King's legacy, thus, is not merely his political ...


Τρυφη And Υβρισ In The Περι Βιων Of Clearchus, Vanessa B. Gorman, Robert J. Gorman 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Τρυφη And Υβρισ In The Περι Βιων Of Clearchus, Vanessa B. Gorman, Robert J. Gorman

Faculty Publications, Department of History

Recent discussions of the fragments of the Περι Βίων have seen the concept of pernicious luxury as a key to understanding aspects of this work of Clearchus. In particular, it is thought that Clearchus reflects a moralizing historiographical schema according to which wealth leads to an effeminate luxury (τρυφή), eventually producing satiety (κόρος), which in turn provokes the afflicted to violence (υβρις), ultimately bringing the subject’s destruction. We maintain, in contrast, that it is anachronistic to attribute this pattern of thought to Clearchus, and further, that the state of the evidence does not permit us to establish that the ...


Philosophy Of Intellect And Vision In The De Anima And De Intellectu Of Alexander Of Aphrodisias, John S. Hendrix 2010 Roger Williams University

Philosophy Of Intellect And Vision In The De Anima And De Intellectu Of Alexander Of Aphrodisias, John S. Hendrix

School of Architecture, Art, and Historic Preservation Faculty Publications

Alexander of Aphrodisias (fl. c. 198–209) was born somewhere around 150, in Aphrodisia on the Aegean Sea. He began his career in Alexandria during the reign of Septimius Severus, was appointed to the peripatetic chair at the Lyceum in Athens in 198, a post established by Marcus Aurelius, wrote a commentary on the De anima of Aristotle, and died in 211. According to Porphyry, Alexander was an authority read in the seminars of Plotinus in Rome. He is the earliest philosopher who saw the active intellect implied in Book III of the De anima of Aristotle as transcendent in ...


Philosophy Of Intellect And Vision In The De Anima Of Themistius, John S. Hendrix 2010 Roger Williams University

Philosophy Of Intellect And Vision In The De Anima Of Themistius, John S. Hendrix

School of Architecture, Art, and Historic Preservation Faculty Publications

Themistius (317–c. 387) was born into an aristocratic family and ran a paripatetic school of philosophy in Constantinople in the mid-fourth century, between 345 and 355. He made use of Alexander’s De anima in his commentary on the De anima of Aristotle, which is considered to be the earliest surviving commentary on Aristotle’s work, as Alexander’s commentary itself did not survive. Themistius may also have been influenced by Plotinus, and Porphyry (232–309), whom he criticizes. Themistius refers often to works of Plato, especially the Timaeus, and attempts a synthesis of Aristotle and Plato, a synthesis ...


Neoplatonism In The Liber Naturalis And Shifā: De Anima Or Metaphysica Of Avicenna (Ibn Sīnā), John S. Hendrix 2010 Roger Williams University

Neoplatonism In The Liber Naturalis And Shifā: De Anima Or Metaphysica Of Avicenna (Ibn Sīnā), John S. Hendrix

School of Architecture, Art, and Historic Preservation Faculty Publications

Avicenna or Ibn Sīnā was born circa 980 in Afshna, near Bukhara, in Persia. He worked briefly for the Samanid administration, but left Bukhara, and lived in the area of Tehran and Isfahan, where he completed the Shifā (Healing [from error]) under the patronage of the Daylamite ruler, ‘Ala’-al Dawla, and wrote his most important Persian work, the Dānish-nāma, which contains works on logic, metaphysics, physics, and mathematics.


A Problem For The Political Reading Of Plato's Republic, Mason Marshall 2010 Pepperdine University

A Problem For The Political Reading Of Plato's Republic, Mason Marshall

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

On one of the most common readings of the Republic, Plato means for us to agree with Socrates and his interlocutors that their aristocratic city is the just polis. For convenience, I call this the political reading. It is no wonder, of course, that this interpretation is as common as it is, since it might be one of the most natural interpretations of the Republic. I argue, though, that it faces a serious problem: Socrates and his interlocutors’ argument for the justice of the aristocratic city has certain deficits, and—more important—there is considerable evidence that Plato was aware ...


Entries On "Priam And Hecuba", "Tiresias", And "Theseus", Carolin Hahnemann 2009 Kenyon College

Entries On "Priam And Hecuba", "Tiresias", And "Theseus", Carolin Hahnemann

Carolin Hahnemann

n/a


Evaluating The Influence Of Anthropogenic Inputs To Bottom-Up Regulation Of The Development, Survival And Emergence Rates Of Mosquito Larvae, David Markman 2009 University of Maryland - College Park

Evaluating The Influence Of Anthropogenic Inputs To Bottom-Up Regulation Of The Development, Survival And Emergence Rates Of Mosquito Larvae, David Markman

David W Markman

In aquatic and semi-aquatic ecosystems, bottom-up effects associated with resource abundance and quality play an important role in the regulation of the development, survival and emergence rates of mosquito larvae. Studying these bottom-up effects with regard to the additive impact that anthropogenic drivers may have in both urban and rural areas may be important to explain why human exposure to mosquito-borne disease is higher in urban versus rural landscapes. This study used observational methods to evaluate mosquito resident species composition across a rural to urban gradient in the Hudson Valley in New York and used experiments to test the role ...


Confucian Moral Cultivation, Longevity, And Public Policy, Chenyang Li 2009 Nanyang Technological University

Confucian Moral Cultivation, Longevity, And Public Policy, Chenyang Li

Chenyang Li

No abstract provided.


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