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Unity And Logos: A Reading Of Theaetetus 201c-210a, Mitchell Miller 2019 Selected Works

Unity And Logos: A Reading Of Theaetetus 201c-210a, Mitchell Miller

Mitchell Miller

Abstract for “Unity and Logos” (Anc Phil 12.1:87-111):

A close reading of Socrates' refutation of the final proposed definition of knowledge, "true opinion with an account." I examine the provocations to further thinking Socrates poses with his dilemma of simplicity and complexity and then by his rejections of the three senses of "account," and I argue that these provocations guide the responsive reader to that rich and determinate understanding of the sort of 'object' which knowledge requires that the Parmenides and the Eleatic dialogues will go on to explicate.

This paper is available at http://pages.vassar.edu ...


Commission Of Two Narratives Of The Psyche: Reading Poqéakh In Nella Larsen’S Quicksand And Ralph Ellison’S Invisible Man, Genuyah S. Reuven 2019 Clark Atlanta University

Commission Of Two Narratives Of The Psyche: Reading Poqéakh In Nella Larsen’S Quicksand And Ralph Ellison’S Invisible Man, Genuyah S. Reuven

Electronic Theses & Dissertations Collection for Atlanta University & Clark Atlanta University

This study focuses on the novels of Quicksand by Nella Larsen and Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison to explore the phenomenon of poqéakh (פֹּקֵחַ) through the fictionalized lived experiences of their protagonists, Helga Crane and invisible man. Each novelist’s representation of poqéakh offers a portrait of the protagonists’ psyches. The narratives reveal an unsettling truth for the protagonists, who are members of a population often targeted, stigmatized, and fashioned or re-fashioned by Americans and various environs in American society, that they must assimilate—not only their bodies, but their psyches too to fit the “white man’s ...


The Poetic Function Of Imagination: The Parallel Process Of Poiêsis, Angela Carlson 2019 Lesley University

The Poetic Function Of Imagination: The Parallel Process Of Poiêsis, Angela Carlson

Expressive Therapies Capstone Theses

In the advent of Postmodernism, modern approaches to understanding the nature of things is being put into question. As the gap between objective and subjective realms of experiences is narrowing, there is an increased need for a more artful approach to science. This paper serves as my attempt to promote the field of Expressive Arts Therapy (ExATh) as a mode of poetic science for understanding the experience of ‘Being’ in the world. Through a critical review of the semantic development of the ancient Greek concepts poiêsis, noêsis, and aisthêsis, the imagination is identified as a function of alêthaic revealing, personified ...


Polytropic Socrates’ Implicit Defense Of Philosophy: Lying, Justice, And Sophistry In Plato’S Lesser Hippias, Samantha M. Trudeau 2019 Carroll College

Polytropic Socrates’ Implicit Defense Of Philosophy: Lying, Justice, And Sophistry In Plato’S Lesser Hippias, Samantha M. Trudeau

Carroll College Student Undergraduate Research Festival

This paper offers an interpretation of Plato’s Lesser Hippias, about which I make several original claims. First, I contend that the dialogue takes place in front of an unnamed audience composed of Socrates’ students and the dialogue is therefore for their benefit, not that of Hippias or Eudicus. I then argue that Socrates juxtaposes himself to Hippias to show the superiority of philosophy to sophistry; I accomplish this through an examination of the cultural significance of Socrates’ physical description of Hippias at 368 and following. I also claim that the central argument of the dialogue is used to demonstrate ...


Saruman As ‘Sophist’ Or Sophist Foil? Tolkien’S Wizards And The Ethics Of Persuasion, Chad Chisholm 2019 Southern Wesleyan University

Saruman As ‘Sophist’ Or Sophist Foil? Tolkien’S Wizards And The Ethics Of Persuasion, Chad Chisholm

Mythlore: A Journal of J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Charles Williams, and Mythopoeic Literature

Persuasive speaking is an important part of J.R.R. Tolkien's fiction, and the wizards Gandalf and Saruman are often the most skilled orators and speakers in the Middle-earth stories. Literary critics and Tolkien scholars (including the author in his prior publications) have spent much time discussing how the oratory of the wizards helps to advance the narrative action within the stories as well as add depth to the wizards themselves and the other characters. Many critics describe the speech of Saruman as 'sophistry,' but does the white wizard really personify the rhetoric of the historical Sophists? The author ...


The Transactions Of Mortal Coil: Hellenic Meaning In The Suffering Of The Iliad And The Oresteia, Stephen L. Bothwell 2019 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH

The Transactions Of Mortal Coil: Hellenic Meaning In The Suffering Of The Iliad And The Oresteia, Stephen L. Bothwell

Honors Bachelor of Arts

The meaning of suffering is enigmatic. To grasp at it cosmologically, I examine both Archaic and Classical Greek views of suffering via their primary literature and culture. Homer’s Iliad reveals the transactionality of suffering as it is embedded in the heroic code through an analysis of the Glaucus-Diomedes exchange. An investigation of Achilles’ development portrays both the Homeric system that equates honor and suffering and the unquantifiable suffering that critiques said system. Meanwhile, a study of Aeschylus’ Oresteia exhibits the interrelation of suffering and learning in Zeus’ law. The progression of the trilogy displays an accruement of wisdom by ...


“I See” Said The Blind Man; “I Know” Said Oedipus: An Analysis Of Physical And Metaphysical Sight Through Greek Tragedy And Philosophy, Emma Barlow 2019 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH

“I See” Said The Blind Man; “I Know” Said Oedipus: An Analysis Of Physical And Metaphysical Sight Through Greek Tragedy And Philosophy, Emma Barlow

Honors Bachelor of Arts

Sight in the ancient world is best understood through Greek tragedy and philosophy. There is a certain duality of sight that is present in tragedy – physical and metaphysical. Physical sight is represented through “vision” and “sight” itself. Metaphysical sight is represented through “knowing” and “understanding”. Physical and metaphysical sight do not necessarily need each other, but the combination of the two results in higher wisdom, something that is sought by one of the most prominent figures in Greek tragedy, Oedipus. In fact, Oedipus Tyrannus, Heracles, and Prometheus Bound best exemplify the duality of sight in tragedy. The seers in Greek ...


Reevaluating The Nika Riot & Placing It In Conversation With The Antioch Riot Of 387, Ty Richer 2019 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH

Reevaluating The Nika Riot & Placing It In Conversation With The Antioch Riot Of 387, Ty Richer

Honors Bachelor of Arts

The reign of the Byzantine emperor Justinian, from 527 to 565, despite its many high points and achievements, was a struggle for him and his people. One of his most famous, or infamous, challenges was during the Nika riots. During this time Justinian sees the people of Constantinople attempt to crown a usurper as emperor instead of him. As Justinian convened with his advisors, hiding from the mob in his palace, one question must have rung true in his mind: how did this happen? This presentation answers this question while also giving an overview to the time and the people ...


Reevaluating The Nika Riot & Placing It In Conversation With The Antioch Riot Of 387, Ty A. Richer 2019 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH

Reevaluating The Nika Riot & Placing It In Conversation With The Antioch Riot Of 387, Ty A. Richer

Honors Bachelor of Arts

The reign of the Byzantine emperor Justinian, from 527 to 565, despite its many high points and achievements, was a struggle for him and his people. One of his most famous, or infamous, challenges was during the Nika riots. During this time Justinian sees the people of Constantinople attempt to crown a usurper as emperor instead of him. As Justinian convened with his advisors, hiding from the mob in his palace, one question must have rung true in his mind: how did this happen? This presentation answers this question while also giving an overview to the time and the people ...


Comparing Ancient To Modern: How Ancient Greece And Rome Provide Insight For Citizenship And Immigration In The 21st Century, Viktoria Schumacher 2019 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH

Comparing Ancient To Modern: How Ancient Greece And Rome Provide Insight For Citizenship And Immigration In The 21st Century, Viktoria Schumacher

Honors Bachelor of Arts

I believe that when searching for solutions to current migration crises and problems with the US immigration system, we must turn to ancient examples. The Ancient Greeks provided examples of both what not to do and what to do when faced with mass migration and a sudden increase in the population of citizens. Additionally, Ancient Rome demonstrated a necessity for a clear definition of citizenship and multiple mechanisms for its extension. The United States has struggled to establish a system which retains exclusivity while still providing assistance in the wake of large groups of displaced people. Ideas from Ancient Greece ...


Aristotle's Quarrel With Socrates: Friendship In Political Thought, John Boersma 2019 Louisiana State Univer

Aristotle's Quarrel With Socrates: Friendship In Political Thought, John Boersma

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

Friendship played an outsized role in ancient political thought in comparison to medieval and modern political philosophies. Most modern scholarship has paid relatively little attention to the role of friendship in ancient political philosophy. Recently, however, scholars are increasingly beginning to investigate classical conceptions of friendship. My dissertation joins this growing interest by examining the importance of friendship in the political thought of Socrates and Aristotle. Specifically, I analyze the divergent approaches that Socrates and Aristotle take to politics and trace these distinct approaches to their differing conceptions of friendship. Through an examination of two Platonic dialogues—the Lysis and ...


Monumenta And Historiographical Method In Livy's Ab Urbe Condita, Tyler Andrew Denton 2019 University of Colorado at Boulder

Monumenta And Historiographical Method In Livy's Ab Urbe Condita, Tyler Andrew Denton

Classics Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This project examines the Latin term monumentum, particularly as it appears in Livy’s history of Rome but also in other Latin authors as points with which Livy’s depiction of monumenta can be compared. In his Preface, Livy refers to his own work as a monumentum (praef. 10) in so far as it has the capacity to present models (exempla) from the past to the readers of the history. Other instances of monumentum, however, in the Ab Urbe Condita become problematic in the course of the narrative, especially in their use as source material for history-writing: physical structures can ...


Aristotle On Animal Self-Motion, Daniel Avi Gilbert Coren 2019 University of Colorado at Boulder

Aristotle On Animal Self-Motion, Daniel Avi Gilbert Coren

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Take a pen or pencil or some other small nearby object and slide it across your desk. The object moved from one place to another because you moved it. It wasn’t moved by itself. But what is the cause of your moving from where you were to where you currently are? You appear to move yourself. This dissertation focuses on what Aristotle has to say about self-motion, especially how and why non-human animals are capable of moving themselves (αὐτὰ ἑαυτὰ κινοῦσιν), that is, flying, swimming, running, crawling or slithering from one place to another. I bring out (a) new ...


A Merely Comic Conclusion: A Comparative Analysis Of Xenophon’S Spartan Constitution, Conor Hogan 2019 Claremont Colleges

A Merely Comic Conclusion: A Comparative Analysis Of Xenophon’S Spartan Constitution, Conor Hogan

CMC Senior Theses

In this paper, I hope to do a small part to bridge the gap that has emerged in this scholarly debate between the historicist and Straussian views of Spartan society. To that end, this paper will analyze the Spartan Constitution according to the Straussian method. That is, I will engage in a close reading of the text, only referencing outside, secondary sources directly when necessary and appropriate. In other cases, their views will simply color this analysis and be referenced as supporting evidence in footnotes. Strauss chose to have only a superficial interaction with the existing scholarship at the time ...


French Classicism In Four Painters: Where It Went And Why, Kristen Tayler Westerduin 2019 Bard College

French Classicism In Four Painters: Where It Went And Why, Kristen Tayler Westerduin

Senior Projects Spring 2019

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Language and Literature and The Division of Arts of Bard College. French Classicism in Four Painters: Where It Went and Why is an analytical approach to the history of classicism and its definitions since being proposed as a style by the ancient Greeks. This paper looks to artists such as Nicolas Poussin, Jacques-Louis David, Charles le Brun, and Eugène Delacroix to understand the evolution of the style’s interpretations within France between the 16th and 19th century.


Xi Jinping And Confucianism: Legitimacy And A National Moral Identity, Makenna Zoglmann 2019 University of Colorado, Boulder

Xi Jinping And Confucianism: Legitimacy And A National Moral Identity, Makenna Zoglmann

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Decades after the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) demonized Confucianism as a backwards philosophy, Confucianism has once again become popular in Chinese political culture and society. This paper investigates how the president of the People's Republic of China, Xi Jinping, is using Confucian rhetoric to legitimize himself and the CCP. The paper explores the Chinese people's search for a national moral identity, the resurgence of Confucianism, and finally examines the speech Xi gave on the 40th Anniversary of the Reforms and Opening-up.


Sagp Annual Meeting October 20 To 21 2018, Anthony Preus 2018 Binghamton University

Sagp Annual Meeting October 20 To 21 2018, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

No abstract provided.


The Architecture Of Law: Building Law In The Classical Tradition, Brian M. McCall 2018 University of Oklahoma

The Architecture Of Law: Building Law In The Classical Tradition, Brian M. Mccall

Brian M McCall

The Architecture of Law explores the metaphor of law as an architectural building project, with eternal law as the foundation, natural law as the frame, divine law as the guidance provided by the architect, and human law as the provider of the defining details and ornamentation. Classical jurisprudence is presented as a synthesis of the work of the greatest minds of antiquity and the medieval period, including Cicero, Artistotle, Gratian, Augustine, and Aquinas; the significant texts of each receive detailed exposition in these pages.
Along with McCall’s development of the architectural image, he raises a question that becomes a ...


Of Ivory And Eros: How Kurtz Was Corrupted By The Congo, Alexander T. Grey 2018 College of the Holy Cross

Of Ivory And Eros: How Kurtz Was Corrupted By The Congo, Alexander T. Grey

The Criterion

While much ink has been spilled about the savagery and rawness of Conrad's magnum opus, Heart of Darkness, few scholars have sought to look at the softer side of Kurtz, Marlow, and the cast of characters. This essay attempts to view the work through the lens of love and the Grecian concepts of eros, philia and agape as they apply to Kurtz's tryst and what can be learned about this tormented man in the jungle when love enters the equation.


J.S. Mill The Democrat: Connecting Mill, Athens, And Election Reform, Devon Wolfe 2018 William & Mary

J.S. Mill The Democrat: Connecting Mill, Athens, And Election Reform, Devon Wolfe

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In this paper, I examine John Stuart Mill's views on representative government in an effort to show his support for democracy. In order to accomplish this, I examine his relationship to the Ancient Athenian direct democracy. I argue that Mill’s appreciation for the guiding principles of the participatory democracy in Athens implies that his own beliefs regarding the principles of democracy are positive and supportive.


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