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Ancient History, Greek and Roman through Late Antiquity Commons

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Maritime Governance: How State Capacity Impacts Piracy And Sea Lane Security, Yuito Ishikawa 2018 College of William and Mary

Maritime Governance: How State Capacity Impacts Piracy And Sea Lane Security, Yuito Ishikawa

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Maritime piracy varies from place to place and from age to age. This thesis aims to explain the variation of piracy across time and space by exploring the capability of establishing maritime governance against piracy. The spatial variation in the number of piratical attacks is explained by calculating the state capacity for governing the surrounding seas called Sea Power Index. The thesis argues that pirates particularly target waters near a state with “medium” levels of sea power because such states are not capable of enforcing strict regulations on piracy but can provide enough infrastructure and economy for pirates to have ...


Wealth In The Pre-Roman Western Mediterranean: Pontós, Alorda Park, And Lattara, Colleen M. Maher 2018 Gettysburg College

Wealth In The Pre-Roman Western Mediterranean: Pontós, Alorda Park, And Lattara, Colleen M. Maher

Student Publications

This paper focuses on discussing whether there were varying levels of wealth in three individual pre-Roman settlements in the western Mediterranean. The goal of this paper is to answer the question of if the different indigenous settlements of Pontós, Alorda Park, and Lattara in the Western Mediterranean experienced variable levels of wealth detectable via the archaeological remains of their prestige goods and houses in the last age or period of their occupation.


Sagp Newsletter Pacific 2018, Anthony Preus 2018 Binghamton University--SUNY

Sagp Newsletter Pacific 2018, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Democracy Vs. Liberty: The Telos Of Government, Ryan C. Yeazell 2018 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH

Democracy Vs. Liberty: The Telos Of Government, Ryan C. Yeazell

Honors Bachelor of Arts

Democracies are known for being relatively stable and ensuring freedom for their citizens. However, those assumptions are called into question by the various failures of modern democracies to both maintain authority and enshrine liberty. Are the institutional checks and balances failing to prevent some of the expected issues with governments based on popular voting? Or is there some other cause of failure outside of the institutional structures themselves?

To examine these questions, I will be comparing a few examples of failed modern democracies with arguably history’s longest lasting democratic government: the Roman Republic. Although separated by over two thousand ...


Philosophy And Politics Perfected: Aristotle’S Greatness Of Soul Embodied In Plutarch’S Alexander The Great, Raquel Grove 2018 Pepperdine University

Philosophy And Politics Perfected: Aristotle’S Greatness Of Soul Embodied In Plutarch’S Alexander The Great, Raquel Grove

Seaver College Research And Scholarly Achievement Symposium

In this paper, I examine the value of Aristotle’s “great-souled man” and the narrative structure of Plutarch’s Life of Alexander as political and philosophical exempla designed to lead men to virtue on a large scale. The confusing, apparently contradictory nature of Aristotle’s virtue “greatness of soul” must be read in the context of the Ethics as a deeply political work. Likewise, Plutarch’s description of Alexander the Great demands examination from a narrative, as well as historical, perspective. Despite their differences in emphasis and method, Aristotle and Plutarch produce writings characterized the same end––each work unites ...


Panel Ii. Gender, Power And Privilege, Ella Huster 2018 University of Redlands

Panel Ii. Gender, Power And Privilege, Ella Huster

the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Student Conference

No abstract provided.


Piecing Together Roman Life And Art: The Impact Of Societal Changes On Developments In Roman Mosaics, Emily A. Lewis 2018 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH

Piecing Together Roman Life And Art: The Impact Of Societal Changes On Developments In Roman Mosaics, Emily A. Lewis

Honors Bachelor of Arts

Although changes in mosaics in ancient Rome can be attributed to various factors such as available resources, skills of the mosaicists, and room aesthetics with wall paintings, the changes in the relationship amongst social classes is a factor that is rarely examined, but strongly impacted these development in mosaic styles. First, an analysis of various mosaics from the 2nd century BC-2nd century AD will be given so that there is an understanding of the changes that occurred. From there, reasons for the adaptations of polychrome into black and white will be assessed; focusing the argument on analysis of ...


Nl Central 2018, Anthony Preus 2018 Binghamton University--SUNY

Nl Central 2018, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Magic Use In Roman Sexuality, Anne Margaret Chenchar 2018 University of Wyoming

Magic Use In Roman Sexuality, Anne Margaret Chenchar

Undergraduate Research Day

2017 Undergraduate Research Day Award Winner
Category: Award for Excellence in the Liberal Arts

The Roman civilization was incredibly dynamic as it grew and accepted new citizens over the years of its rule. Through the diversity of the culture Romans integrated superstition, and magic use into their society. Roman society put value on the ability to produce viable offspring, and be a competent sexual partner in marriage. Through the stress of this value, Romans who fell short sexually turned to magical practices to help heal them. This idea was so prominent in the society that Gaius Petronius wrote Satyricon a ...


The Marriage Of Cicero: Matrimonial Metaphor In The Second Philippic, Elijah J. Mears 2018 University of North Carolina at Greensboro

The Marriage Of Cicero: Matrimonial Metaphor In The Second Philippic, Elijah J. Mears

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

This paper examines Cicero’s self-presentation in the second Philippic oration and his casting of himself in opposition to Marc Antony, particular in regard to themes of conjugal and marital virtue. I argue that Cicero attempts to augment his own claim to be helmsman of the Roman state by portraying himself as metaphorically married to the Republic: Cicero, throughout the Philippics, bolsters his own virtues by portraying himself in opposition to Antony’s vices, particularly Antony’s many sexual and romantic misdeeds, including his “marriage” to the younger Curio. This comparison points not only to Cicero’s own sexual virtue ...


Tragedy And Theodicy: The Role Of The Sufferer From Job To Ahab, Nora Carroll 2018 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Tragedy And Theodicy: The Role Of The Sufferer From Job To Ahab, Nora Carroll

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

The character of Job starts in literature, a trope and archetype of the suffering man who potentially gains wisdom through suffering. Job’s characterization informs a comparison to Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare’s King Lear, Milton’s Paradise Lost, and finally Melville’s Moby-Dick. These versions of Job rally, fight, and rebel against a universe that was once loving and fair towards a more chaotic and nihilistic one. Job’s suffering is on the mark of all tragedy because he not only experiences a downfall, he gains wisdom through universalizing his torment. The Job trope not only stresses the role ...


The Amazons Of Exekias And Eupolis: Demystifying Changes In Gender Roles, Marisa Anne Infante 2018 Southern Methodist University

The Amazons Of Exekias And Eupolis: Demystifying Changes In Gender Roles, Marisa Anne Infante

SMU Journal of Undergraduate Research

n this paper, I will examine the changing gender roles of women as the Athenian government changes from a tyranny in the Archaic period to a democracy in the Classical period by comparing a Black-Figure Amphora, which depicts an image of Achilles Killing Penthesilea, by Exekias and a Red-Figure Column Krater, which depicts an image of an Amazon on Side A and an unidentified figure on Side B, by Eupolis. The creation of democracy was not the universal celebration that it is often praised to be in modern times. I will demonstrate this through a visual analysis of how the ...


Nl East Scs 2018, Anthony Preus 2018 Binghamton University--SUNY

Nl East Scs 2018, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Victorious Athena: The Cult And The Temple Of Athena Nike, Brynlie-Sage Johnston 2018 Bard College

Victorious Athena: The Cult And The Temple Of Athena Nike, Brynlie-Sage Johnston

Senior Projects Spring 2018


Senior Project submitted to The Division of Languages and Literature of Bard College.


Crazy In The Garden, Martin Pate Katzoff 2018 Bard College

Crazy In The Garden, Martin Pate Katzoff

Senior Projects Fall 2018

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Arts of Bard College.


Pharsalus: Fall Of The Roman Alexander, Shane T. Ciancanelli 2018 Bard College

Pharsalus: Fall Of The Roman Alexander, Shane T. Ciancanelli

Senior Projects Fall 2018

This paper explores the lives of Pompey the Great and Julius Caesar, following their journey from young Patricians to their clash on the plains of Pharsalus in Greece. The reason for this is to find why it was that Caesar was victorious over Pompey, evaluating their skills as both politicians and military leaders.

Part one follows Pompey and looks at his sudden rise to prominence as a skilled general at a young age, and his tumultuous political career after retiring from military life. Part two explores the life of Caesar; his more traditional rise in comparison to Pompey, his sudden ...


“Oh, Phaedrus, If I Don’T Know My Phaedrus I Must Be Forgetting Who I Am Myself”: Glimpses Of Self In Divine Erotic Madness, Jared de Uriarte 2018 Bard College

“Oh, Phaedrus, If I Don’T Know My Phaedrus I Must Be Forgetting Who I Am Myself”: Glimpses Of Self In Divine Erotic Madness, Jared De Uriarte

Senior Projects Spring 2018

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Social Studies of Bard College.


Life—And Death—In The Late Antique City At Konjuh, Carolyn S. Snively, Goran Sanev 2018 Gettysburg College

Life—And Death—In The Late Antique City At Konjuh, Carolyn S. Snively, Goran Sanev

Classics Faculty Publications

Death was a part of life, perhaps a frequent and highly visible aspect of daily life in a Late Antique town such as the anonymous city at Golemo Gradiste, village of Konjuh. The residents went about their daily activities of farming, crafts, food preparation, textile production, mining, and metallurgy The several skeletons found within the city, i.e., two children probably killed by falling debris and several cist burials on the northern terrace, indicate that death was frequent and familiar: for the residents of the city the threat of violent and unexpected death was always present.


The Mythological Perspective Of Modern Media: Cross-Cultural Consciousness And Modern Myths, Rebecca E. Evans 2018 James Madison University

The Mythological Perspective Of Modern Media: Cross-Cultural Consciousness And Modern Myths, Rebecca E. Evans

Senior Honors Projects, 2010-current

This piece assesses the cultural implications of modern narratives that incorporate classical mythology, specifically focusing on the hero’s journey. When the similarities of different myths across different cultures are analyzed, it becomes clear that there are modern analogs that incorporate mythic qualities and cultural values. These mythic foundations are analyzed here in popular works like Harry Potter, Star Trek, and Legend of Zelda, where the hero’s journey becomes an almost universal experience that inspires cross-cultural consciousness. The hero’s journey has evolved from a simple literary tool into a cross-cultural touchstone that shapes narratives into familiar works of ...


Adoration And Art: Ancient Egypt, Greece, And Rome, Fiona Wirth 2018 James Madison University

Adoration And Art: Ancient Egypt, Greece, And Rome, Fiona Wirth

Senior Honors Projects, 2010-current

"Adoration and Art" focuses upon religious artifacts from the ancient Mediterranean and explores what these artifacts reveal about the religious practices and sacred spaces of their cultures. This Honors College capstone consisted of an exhibition through the Lisanby Museum utilizing artifacts from the Madison Art Collection. This text is the full exhibition catalog compiled by the student through her research as an intern for the Lisanby Museum.


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