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Current Research: Toward A Collaborative Development Of A Truly Comprehensive Multi-State Material Culture Database, Duncan P. McKinnon 2018 University of Central Arkansas

Current Research: Toward A Collaborative Development Of A Truly Comprehensive Multi-State Material Culture Database, Duncan P. Mckinnon

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Throughout the past several years, I have been compiling, with the help of several Caddo researchers, a comprehensive multi-state database primarily composed of whole Caddo vessels from published excavations, private collections, and archaeological reports. At present, the database contains over 13,000 vessel entries from over 500 sites ranging from a single vessel recorded at a site to hundreds. Over the years, the database has evolved to contain, where applicable, attribute fields on type, variety, motif designs (largely using the Glossary of Motifs published in the Spiro shell engravings, collegiate assignment, form, temper, decorative method (incised, brushed, etc.), context (burial ...


Swagger Like Us: Black Millennials’ Perceptions Of 1990s Urban Brands, Courtney Danielle Johnson 2018 Iowa State University

Swagger Like Us: Black Millennials’ Perceptions Of 1990s Urban Brands, Courtney Danielle Johnson

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Hip-hop is a significant cultural and artistic phenomenon that was created in the Black community and has since spread around the world (Aldridge & Stewart, 2005). Hip-hop culture has a unique and authentic clothing style, music style, and language (McLeod, 1999). The relationship between hip-hop culture, rap music, and fashion has global appeal (Power & Hauge, 2008). This research is centered around the evolution of this cultural fashion movement in Black history as it relates to Black millennials today and their experiences fashioning their bodies. There is not a significant amount of literature on urbanwear brands that came out of hip-hop culture or the owners of these fashion brands. The purpose of this study is to examine Black millennials attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) about their perceptions and knowledge of prominent, Black-owned, urban fashion brands that emerged in the late 1980s and throughout the 1990s during the hip-hop fashion revolution. Black millennials currently attending or who are alumni of HBCU’s were specifically chosen as the focus of this study because of the heightened immersion in Black culture that a HBCU environment provides. Throughout history, Black individuals have contributed significantly to American society, and hip-hop culture is one of those contributions as it was a major cultural revolution. While Black appearance and clothing has been under scrutiny in America since slavery, urbanwear fashion was a way for Black individuals to express themselves and represent their community. Ethnic dress, such as urban styles of dress, are clothing worn by individuals to express their belonging to a community with a common heritage (Kaiser, 2012; Eicher & Sumberg, 1995). The participants in this study explained their experiences with urban fashion brands, support of Black-owned brands, stereotypes associated with urban fashion, and how hip-hop and urbanwear still inspires their style today. The narratives and perceptions from Black individuals has changed over time and viewing urban fashion through the lens of various social science theories such as Critical Race Theory, Afrocentric theory, and symbolic interaction will further explain the relationship between Black millennials and 1990s ...


Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2017 Annual Report, Michael Nassaney 2018 Western Michigan University

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2017 Annual Report, Michael Nassaney

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

In 2017, the Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project (hereafter the "Project") continued its focus on discovering and sharing the history of Fort St. Joseph while emphasizing the importance of community partnerships. This was a logical theme for 2017 since the Project has long been a collaboration between Western Michigan University (WMU) faculty and students, the City of Niles, the Fort St. Joseph Archaeology Advisory Committee (see Appendix A), interested stakeholders, supporters, members, and community volunteers in the greater Niles area. In addition, the Project has embraced a community service-learning model to guide our field, laboratory, and outreach activities. Students learn ...


Technology Then And Now 6: Flintlock Muskets, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2018 Western Michigan University

Technology Then And Now 6: Flintlock Muskets, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Flintlocks were imported from Europe and widely distributed in New France for hunting and warfare.

Technology Then and Now was developed by the students (Nicole Aquino, John Campbell, Patrick Dwyer, Abby Floyd, Jacob Kowalczyk, Allie Lewis, Amanda Owens, Brendan Sapato, and Callisto Wojcikowski) in the Museum Studies class (HIST 4080) at Western Michigan University under the direction of Professor Michael Nassaney. The research, contents, and design of the exhibit were made possible through the support and assistance of Christina Arseneau, David Brose, Mary Ellen Drolet, Joe Hines, Larry Horrigan, Cori Ivens, Erika Loveland, Meghan Williams and Michael Worline.

Full size ...


Technology Then And Now 5: Birch Bark Canoes, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2018 Western Michigan University

Technology Then And Now 5: Birch Bark Canoes, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Birch bark canoes were a technologically-sophisticated means to travel and transport goods during the fur trade.

Technology Then and Now was developed by the students (Nicole Aquino, John Campbell, Patrick Dwyer, Abby Floyd, Jacob Kowalczyk, Allie Lewis, Amanda Owens, Brendan Sapato, and Callisto Wojcikowski) in the Museum Studies class (HIST 4080) at Western Michigan University under the direction of Professor Michael Nassaney. The research, contents, and design of the exhibit were made possible through the support and assistance of Christina Arseneau, David Brose, Mary Ellen Drolet, Joe Hines, Larry Horrigan, Cori Ivens, Erika Loveland, Meghan Williams and Michael Worline.

Full ...


Technology Then And Now 2: Glass Beads, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2018 Western Michigan University

Technology Then And Now 2: Glass Beads, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

People at Fort St. Joseph used glass beads to embellish their appearance in the eighteenth century.

Technology Then and Now was developed by the students (Nicole Aquino, John Campbell, Patrick Dwyer, Abby Floyd, Jacob Kowalczyk, Allie Lewis, Amanda Owens, Brendan Sapato, and Callisto Wojcikowski) in the Museum Studies class (HIST 4080) at Western Michigan University under the direction of Professor Michael Nassaney. The research, contents, and design of the exhibit were made possible through the support and assistance of Christina Arseneau, David Brose, Mary Ellen Drolet, Joe Hines, Larry Horrigan, Cori Ivens, Erika Loveland, Meghan Williams and Michael Worline.

Full ...


Technology Then And Now 3: Building A House In New France, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2018 Western Michigan University

Technology Then And Now 3: Building A House In New France, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph buildings were constructed using Old World techniques and local and imported raw materials.

Technology Then and Now was developed by the students (Nicole Aquino, John Campbell, Patrick Dwyer, Abby Floyd, Jacob Kowalczyk, Allie Lewis, Amanda Owens, Brendan Sapato, and Callisto Wojcikowski) in the Museum Studies class (HIST 4080) at Western Michigan University under the direction of Professor Michael Nassaney. The research, contents, and design of the exhibit were made possible through the support and assistance of Christina Arseneau, David Brose, Mary Ellen Drolet, Joe Hines, Larry Horrigan, Cori Ivens, Erika Loveland, Meghan Williams and Michael Worline.

Full ...


Technology Then And Now 1: Technology Then And Now, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2018 Western Michigan University

Technology Then And Now 1: Technology Then And Now, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Archaeologists employ technology to learn how goods were made and used at Fort St. Joseph in the eighteenth century.

Technology Then and Now was developed by the students (Nicole Aquino, John Campbell, Patrick Dwyer, Abby Floyd, Jacob Kowalczyk, Allie Lewis, Amanda Owens, Brendan Sapato, and Callisto Wojcikowski) in the Museum Studies class (HIST 4080) at Western Michigan University under the direction of Professor Michael Nassaney. The research, contents, and design of the exhibit were made possible through the support and assistance of Christina Arseneau, David Brose, Mary Ellen Drolet, Joe Hines, Larry Horrigan, Cori Ivens, Erika Loveland, Meghan Williams and ...


The Lithic And Ceramic Artifacts From The Spradley Site (41na206), Nacogdoches County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Paul Marceaux 2018 Center for Regional Heritage Research, Stephen F. Austin State University

The Lithic And Ceramic Artifacts From The Spradley Site (41na206), Nacogdoches County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Paul Marceaux

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Spradley site (41NA206) is a Native American archaeological site in the Bayou La Nana valley in Nacogdoches County in the East Texas Pineywoods. Bayou La Nana is a southward-flowing tributary to the Angelina River. The site is best known for its late 17th-early 18th century Historic Caddo period occupation, and the recovery of a number of European trade goods from habitation deposits, but the site was also occupied in Late Archaic (ca. 5000-2500 years B.P.), Woodland (ca. 2500-1150 years B.P.), and pre-A.D. 1400 Caddo periods. The Spradley site was the scene of Stephen F. Austin State ...


Documentation Of Ancestral Caddo Ceramic Vessels And Other Artifacts From East Texas Sites In The George T. Wright Collection At The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum Of Natural History, Timothy K. Perttula, Mark Walters, Bo Nelson 2018 Center for Regional Heritage Research, Stephen F. Austin State University

Documentation Of Ancestral Caddo Ceramic Vessels And Other Artifacts From East Texas Sites In The George T. Wright Collection At The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum Of Natural History, Timothy K. Perttula, Mark Walters, Bo Nelson

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

From the early 1900s to the mid-1940s George T. Wright was a landowner (Kiomatia Plantation) and Vice-President of the Kiomitia Mercantile Company: General Merchandise in Kiomatia and Paris, Texas. He was also an avid Indian artifact collector at sites along the Red River in Red River County, Texas, as well as in McCurtain County, Oklahoma, especially the collection of Caddo ceramic vessels, and also dug at sites he knew in the area, including the Wright Plantation site (41RR7), which he owned, and the Sam Coffman site (now known as Sam Kaufman, 41RR16, and for a short time known as the ...


Current Research At Arkansas Archeological Survey’S Henderson State University Research Station, Mary Beth D. Trubitt, Chelsea Cinotto 2018 Arkansas Archaeological Survey, HSU Research Station

Current Research At Arkansas Archeological Survey’S Henderson State University Research Station, Mary Beth D. Trubitt, Chelsea Cinotto

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

During 2017, the Arkansas Archeological Survey celebrated its 50th anniversary with a series of website postings (http://archeology.uark.edu/who-we-are/50moments/), a forum at the annual meeting of the Arkansas Archeological Society, and a symposium at the annual Southeastern Archaeological Conference in Tulsa. In addition, the Survey made strides in documenting and archiving its history and collections. The Survey’s Henderson State University (HSU) Research Station in Arkadelphia continued to inventory curated artifact collections and scan older paper records and color slides. Trubitt and Cinotto, assisted by volunteers during weekly Archeology Lab Days, are updating the station’s curated ...


Current Research: Ceramic Production And Distribution During The Formative Caddo Period: A Stylistic And Provenance Investigation Of The Arkansas River Valley, Shawn Lambert 2018 University of Oklahoma

Current Research: Ceramic Production And Distribution During The Formative Caddo Period: A Stylistic And Provenance Investigation Of The Arkansas River Valley, Shawn Lambert

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Formative Caddo Period (A.D. 850-1100) of eastern Oklahoma was marked by dramatic material and ritual changes, culminating in the construction of aggregated villages and ceremonial centers. Formative Caddo groups are notable for their highly complex and ritually-charged ceramic vessels that were unlike anything archeologists have seen in the American Southeast. Tracing the rapid development and spread of this early fine ware assemblage across a variety of social, ritual, and mortuary contexts is key to understanding the shared religious and ritual traditions of the pre-Columbian Arkansas River valley and surrounding Coastal Plain drainages. Yet despite nearly 60 years of ...


Current Research: Recent Documentation Of Ceramic Vessels And Other Funerary Objects In The Titus Phase Cemetery At The Tuck Carpenter Site, Camp County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Mark Walters, Kevin Stingley, Tom Middlebrook 2018 Center for Regional Heritage Research, Stephen F. Austin State University

Current Research: Recent Documentation Of Ceramic Vessels And Other Funerary Objects In The Titus Phase Cemetery At The Tuck Carpenter Site, Camp County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Mark Walters, Kevin Stingley, Tom Middlebrook

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Recently, we had the opportunity to complete the documentation of Late Caddo period Titus phase ceramic vessels and other funerary offerings from the Tuck Carpenter site (41CP5) in the Big Cypress Creek basin in Camp County, Texas. This portion of the funerary assemblage from the site has been in the hands of R. W. Walsh since the 1960s. Unable to properly care for the assemblage, he recently donated his collection to an anonymous individual, who graciously allowed us to fully document these funerary offerings.

The Tuck Carpenter site (41CP5), on Dry Creek several miles from its confluence with Big Cypress ...


Feature-Scale Analysis Using Ground-Penetrating Radar And Low Altitude Prospection At The Collins Mounds Site, Northwest Arkansas, Stephanie M. Sullivan, Tiago Attore 2018 University of Arkansas

Feature-Scale Analysis Using Ground-Penetrating Radar And Low Altitude Prospection At The Collins Mounds Site, Northwest Arkansas, Stephanie M. Sullivan, Tiago Attore

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Geophysical survey and other non-invasive methods are, in some cases, the only options available for archaeological investigation. This is exemplified at the Collins site, a possible Late Woodland to Middle Mississippian period, multi-mound, civic ceremonial center in Northwest Arkansas. The site is located on private property and although excavation is not allowed, non-invasive survey methods are permitted on its northern section. This paper presents the results of a ground-penetrating radar survey over Mounds B, C, and D. The results reveal a number of features that are interpreted as mortuary structures as well as evidence of multiple building episodes over time ...


The Effects Of Horses And Raiding On The Salt Industry In Northwest Louisiana, Paul N. Eubanks 2018 Middle Tennessee State University

The Effects Of Horses And Raiding On The Salt Industry In Northwest Louisiana, Paul N. Eubanks

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

When French explorers first arrived in northwest Louisiana, the local Caddo Indians had already earned a reputation for being important players in the salt trade. Likewise, many western Caddo groups living near the southern Plains were known for their involvement in the horse trade. In the first part of this paper, the relationship between the local salt industry and the introduction of the horse is considered. It is suggested that at least some of the salt made in northwest Louisiana was being fed to horses and other livestock acquired either directly or indirectly from the Spanish. In addition to its ...


Addressing The Cosmological Significance Of A Pot: A Search For Cosmological Structure In The Craig Mound, Shawn Lambert 2018 University of Oklahoma

Addressing The Cosmological Significance Of A Pot: A Search For Cosmological Structure In The Craig Mound, Shawn Lambert

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Ceramic vessels and cosmological structure at first may seem quite unrelated. Many argue the basic and perhaps only function of a pot was a simple human-made container which held foodstuff for cooking and serving purposes. Pre-Contact communities also used ceramics to display complex iconography, some of which may represent important cosmological meanings in time and space. For this paper, I examine the temporal and spatial placement of pottery in 98 Craig Mound burials at the Spiro site in search for cosmological patterns in the imagery of the vessels. Only burials unassociated with the Great Mortuary and the Spirit Lodge were ...


Sustaining Autonomous Communities In The Modern United States (The United Communities Of America), Lucas Hester 2017 Linfield College

Sustaining Autonomous Communities In The Modern United States (The United Communities Of America), Lucas Hester

Senior Theses

America has become industrialized and characterized by social anxiety and overconsumption. The inability to be sustainable has led the once plentiful and flourishing nation into an ongoing sustainability crisis. Even if there is a deep connection between them, this essay focuses on social sustainability rather than ecological. It argues for an intentional community-based framework to keep American life sustainable. Pollution, civil unrest, and intense social anxiety create unfulfilling life conditions for many American citizens. Using examples from modern American intentional communities, I will explain the need for self-directing, close-knit communities. Flourishing community members, as it will be considered from sociological ...


Remembering Kate Gleason: Introducing A Twentieth-Century Businesswoman To Twenty-First Century Students, Michael J. Brown, Rebecca Edwards, Tina O. Lent 2017 Rochester Institute of Technology

Remembering Kate Gleason: Introducing A Twentieth-Century Businesswoman To Twenty-First Century Students, Michael J. Brown, Rebecca Edwards, Tina O. Lent

The Seneca Falls Dialogues Journal

In the fall of 2015, the faculty of the Museum Studies Program at RIT mounted an exhibition titled "Kate Gleason, Visionary: A Tribute on Her 150th Birthday." While Kate Gleason’s name is familiar on the RIT campus because the College of Engineering is named for her, this association obscures recognition of her many and varied accomplishments. The challenge we undertook was to contextualize her work in engineering within her other entrepreneurial endeavors in manufacturing, banking, and building, focusing on the innovation and vision that united them. In addition, we wanted Gleason’s career and accomplishments to be compelling and ...


Christopher Pizzino. Arresting Development: Comics At The Boundaries Of Literature. Austin: U Of Texas P, 2016., Katlin M. Sweeney 2017 San Diego State University

Christopher Pizzino. Arresting Development: Comics At The Boundaries Of Literature. Austin: U Of Texas P, 2016., Katlin M. Sweeney

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

Review of Christopher Pizzino. Arresting Development: Comics at the Boundaries of Literature. Austin: U of Texas P, 2016.


Design Plan For The Sawmill Town History Wing At The Texas Forestry Museum, Kendall D. Gay 2017 Stephen F Austin State University

Design Plan For The Sawmill Town History Wing At The Texas Forestry Museum, Kendall D. Gay

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The Texas Forestry Museum in Lufkin, Texas is the only forestry museum in the state. It preserves artifacts and educates visitors about Texas’ forest industry history. The museum has a Sawmill Town History Wing that is outdated and in need of a refreshing exhibit design based on current best practices. Using a previous museum audit as a guide, the new exhibit will have better flow, panel aesthetics, content, and interactive elements. By creating a new exhibit, the museum is better able to educate and entertain the visitors about Texas’ forest industry history.


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